Staff View
Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with switchgrass in the New Jersey Pine Barrens ecosystem

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with switchgrass in the New Jersey Pine Barrens ecosystem
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bindell
NamePart (type = given)
Molly
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
DisplayForm
Molly Bindell
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhang
NamePart (type = given)
Ning
DisplayForm
Ning Zhang
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dighton
NamePart (type = given)
John
DisplayForm
John Dighton
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
White
NamePart (type = given)
James
DisplayForm
James White
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gianfagna
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas
DisplayForm
Thomas Gianfagna
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM fungi) are a group of mutualistic, root-colonizing, microorganisms that have enormous importance in ecosystem functioning, agricultural production, and habitat conservation. Despite their relatively small taxonomic diversity, they associate with over 80% of terrestrial plants. AM fungal species are often described through morphological differences, such as, spore wall features. However, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become an increasingly popular method to expand our understanding of AM fungal global diversity patterns. The drivers of AM fungal diversity patterns remain poorly understood. This dissertation, therefore, combines Illumina MiSeq sequencing and microscopic observations to uncover the AM fungal communities inhabiting switchgrass roots in the Pine Barrens ecosystem, and compare those communities with those from agroecosystems. The AM fungal communities of the rare and unique Pine Barrens ecosystem were previously unknown. Illumina sequencing results uncovered several clades unique to the Pine Barrens ecosystem, as well as, clades unique to agricultural fields, with many potentially novel species. This dissertation also developed a fully annotated, bioinformatic workflow for the study of AM fungal diversity via Illumina sequencing. Developing this AM fungal Illumina workflow showed that certain bioinformatic decisions can alter downstream AM fungal diversity results dramatically. Reference database selection was found to be a key decision in the workflow process. A pot experiment was also conducted in order to explore whether or not the acidic soils of the Pine Barrens influence the extent of switchgrass root colonization by and diversity of AM fungi. Native Pine Barrens AM fungi and soil were either left alone or amended with calcium carbonate (lime) in order to test whether soil pH plays a role in shaping the AM fungal communities, as previous studies have shown mixed results. Although the experiment didn’t yield much significant data, it found that plants grown without AM fungi and those with acidic soil grew bigger than those with AM fungi and those with more neutral soil. Better control over inoculation procedures and abiotic factors may shed more light on these findings. While this dissertation research helps us better understand AM fungal global diversity patterns, lingering questions remain on how these fungi function in different environments, why species exist in certain places, and how these fungi can be realistically implemented in sustainable agricultural practices.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Switchgrass
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9387
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (184 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Molly Bindell
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Pine Barrens (N.J.)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-s8pb-3w11
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bindell
GivenName
Molly
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-12-03 14:21:52
AssociatedEntity
Name
Molly Bindell
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2019-08-02
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after August 2nd, 2019.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-12-03T14:00:44
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-12-03T14:05:17
ApplicationName
Adobe PDF Library 15.0
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021