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Political protest in the Trump era

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Political protest in the Trump era
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Careem
NamePart (type = given)
Akeela
DisplayForm
Akeela Careem
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jussim
NamePart (type = given)
Lee
DisplayForm
Lee Jussim
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sanchez
NamePart (type = given)
Diana
DisplayForm
Diana Sanchez
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wilder
NamePart (type = given)
David
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David Wilder
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The United States has experienced a wave of political protest action since the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. The present study investigated possible psychological motivators for this protest action by liberals and moderates. The potential motivators included perceived moral violations by the president, protesters’ social identity (defined as political ideology), opposition to the president’s political policies, perceiving the president as having many character failings, and dislike of the president. The study employed a survey measuring political protest activity, as well as measures capturing all the hypothesized predictors. Data was collected from two samples, university undergraduates and Mechanical Turk workers, and analyzed together as one combined sample. Results revealed that protest behavior since the election was predicted by perceived individualizing moral violations by President Trump, and included an interaction between individualizing moral violations and individualizing moral foundations, such that protest was highest when both violations and foundations were also high. In addition, protest behavior was predicted by perceived binding moral violations by President Trump, and by perceived economic/government liberty moral violations by President Trump. Further, protesters’ social identity (political ideology), and opposition to President Trump’s policies also predicted protest behavior. Finally, protest was also predicted by perceived character failings of President Trump, and by dislike of President Trump. Altogether, these results suggest that protest activism is predicted by dissatisfaction with the president in moral and policy realms, as well as a general dislike of him and concerns about his character. It is possible that protest activism is triggered when people encounter a vast array of aversive actions and qualities (real or perceived) in their current leader. In addition, although this study was restricted to protesters who were liberals and moderates, it is possible that these findings would generalize to protesters of any political ideology.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Protest movements -- United States -- 21st century
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Motivation (Psychology)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9498
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (118 pages)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Akeela Careem
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-5qb7-cy66
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Careem
GivenName
Akeela
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-07 16:45:31
AssociatedEntity
Name
Akeela Careem
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
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ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-01-08T12:11:37
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-01-08T07:11:39
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1.4
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