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Growth, stability, and resilience of U.S. metropolitan regions, 1990-2017

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TitleInfo
Title
Growth, stability, and resilience of U.S. metropolitan regions, 1990-2017
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kwon
NamePart (type = given)
Jinwoo
NamePart (type = date)
1983-
DisplayForm
Jinwoo Kwon
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lahr
NamePart (type = given)
Michael
DisplayForm
Michael Lahr
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
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2019-01
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2019
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Various national and regional socioeconomic shocks such as recessions can affect the stability of regional economies. Still, regions react in diverse ways to the same forces; some recover slowly despite being less affected while others recover rapidly despite being heavily impacted. To examine the dynamics of regional economies, this study focuses on the extent to which a region can avoid faltering in a crisis (stability) and how quickly it can respond positively to the crisis (resilience), while sustaining a long-run pattern of expansion (growth). This study presents two new measures of recessionary periods of 382 U.S. metropolitan areas for stability and resilience, in addition to the use of the overall growth rate, using monthly data from January 1990 through March 2017.

This study categorizes metropolitan areas into eight categories by using nationwide or median figures. Results demonstrate that a good deal of variation exists among metropolitan areas in terms of growth, stability, and resilience and that only a few are relatively stable and resilient while growing fast. Four of the eight categories are heavily loaded, with each containing slightly less than 20% of all metropolitan areas. Curiously, two are the categories of metropolitan areas that grew fast and were stable; the others are the polar opposite set, which grew slowly and were unstable. This suggests that stable metropolitan areas tend to grow faster but the level of resilience varies greatly among them.

This study then examines the geography of the outcomes of the classification scheme. As established elsewhere, from 1990 to 2017 metropolitan areas of the Northeast grew slowly, and those of the West and South were more apt to grow more rapidly. These general growth trends are undoubtedly at least partly connected to general geographic changes in trade patterns which moved away from Europe and toward Mexico and the Pacific Rim. Less well known over the study period is that metropolitan areas of the Northeast were also more unstable than most of their equivalents elsewhere in the U.S., and those in the U.S. West tended to be more resilient to their own vagaries.

To identify explanatory variables that affect growth, stability, and resilience, this study performs seemingly unrelated regression, three-stage least squares, and categorical analyses. A few variables have shown statistical significance on the metropolitan employment dynamics, regardless of national recession periods, Census Regions, or economy scales. The wide applicability of these variables may thus be suitable for consideration as a federal policy. Other variables showing statistical significance for a particular time, region, or economy scale may help set goals for specific metropolitan areas.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Planning and Public Policy
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Business cycles--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Economic stabilization--United States
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9527
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (124 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jinwoo Kwon
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-1qzy-cd66
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kwon
GivenName
Jinwoo
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-11 08:49:18
AssociatedEntity
Name
Jinwoo Kwon
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2019-01-14T13:05:43
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-01-14T13:05:43
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