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Genetic and hormonal control of maize inflorescence architecture

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TitleInfo
Title
Genetic and hormonal control of maize inflorescence architecture
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Liu
NamePart (type = given)
Qiujie
NamePart (type = date)
1990-
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Qiujie liu
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gallavotti
NamePart (type = given)
Andrea
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Andrea Gallavotti
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Maliga
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Pal
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Pal Maliga
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Dong
NamePart (type = given)
Juan
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Juan Dong
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Advisory Committee
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Name (type = personal)
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Singson
NamePart (type = given)
Andrew
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Andrew Singson
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Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
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2019-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important commercial crops in the world as well as an important model organism for basic research in plant biology. The shoot architecture of maize is primarily determined by apical and axillary meristems, specialized groups of stem cells that are responsible for producing branches, lateral organs, and stems. Thus the maintenance and initiation of meristems can directly affect maize reproductive potential and yield. A major goal of my research thesis was to understand the role of different genetic, hormonal and environmental factors in regulating maize shoot growth to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying maize architecture.

In the first chapter of my thesis, I contributed to the characterization of the role of auxin signaling in regulating maize architecture by studying two semi-dominant mutants defective in the early stages of reproductive organogenesis, Barren inflorescence1 and Barren inflorescence4 (Bif1 and Bif4). BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, important negative regulators of the auxin signaling pathway. By in situ hybridizations and yeast-2-hybrid screens, I showed that many maize activating AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs) interact with both BIF1 and BIF4 and could potentially play a role in regulating maize inflorescence development. As part of this study, we provided evidence that BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator essential for maize axillary meristem initiation (Gallavotti et al., 2004), is a potential target of auxin signaling. This work has been published in PNAS in 2015 and I was a co-first author (Galli et al., 2015).

In the second chapter of my thesis, we provided new insights into the interplay between inflorescence development and mineral nutrition. Boron is a fundamental micronutrient for plant growth. Previous studies in our lab showed that ROTTEN EAR (RTE), a maize boron efflux transporter, is necessary for maize inflorescence development and fertility (Chatterjee et al., 2014). Here we characterized several RTE-like genes in maize, and showed that the close paralogous gene RTE2, which shares a similar expression pattern with RTE, strongly enhances the rte phenotype in boron deficient conditions, resulting in stunted plants with strong vegetative and reproductive defects. This work showed that in soils with poor boron content both transporter proteins, RTE and RTE2, are necessary to support growth and fertility of maize plants. My main contribution to this study, published in Genetics (Chatterjee et al., 2017), was to characterize the expression of different gene family members.

In the last chapter of my thesis, my research focused on a novel recessive mutant called needle1 (ndl1). ndl1 is a temperature sensitive mutant with variable phenotypic expressivity, showing several defects in development, the most notable of which is the formation of tassels with reduced number of branches and spikelets. Interestingly, ndl1 mutants showed strong genetic interactions with several auxin-related mutants, as well as a lower concentration of auxin in inflorescence meristems. By positional cloning and transgenic complementation, I demonstrated that NDL1 encodes a mitochondrial metalloprotease belonging to the FTSH (FILAMENTOUS TEMPERATURE-SENSITIVE) protease family. In addition, ndl1 mutants showed ROS (reactive oxygen species) hyperaccumulation and strong upregulation of many genes involved in stress responses and mitochondrial retrograde regulation (MRR). Thus the characterization and identification of NDL1 provides new insights into the interaction between redox status and auxin function in meristems, and reveals how genetic and environmental factors contribute to the establishment of maize architecture. With the ongoing warming of our planet, it is more and more important to better understand how crop plants can cope with extreme environments.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Plant Biology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Corn--Genetics
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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electronic resource
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Extent
1 online resource (116 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Qiujie Liu
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School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-2smd-qq43
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
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liu
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Qiujie
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Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-09 11:27:09
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Qiujie liu
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Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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2019-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2020-01-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 31st, 2020.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
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Open
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2019-01-09T15:54:21
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