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The cultural context of peer aggression in schools

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TitleInfo
Title
The cultural context of peer aggression in schools
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Raia-Hawrylak
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Alicia
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1985-
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Alicia Raia-Hawrylak
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author
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Carr
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Patrick J.
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Patrick J. Carr
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Krivo
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Lauren J.
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Lauren J. Krivo
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Advisory Committee
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co-chair
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Shepherd
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Hana
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Hana Shepherd
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Daipha
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Phaedra
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Phaedra Daipha
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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2019
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2019-01
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2019
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation examines the organizational and group-level cultural processes that shape the context for peer interpersonal aggression in high schools. I use a mixed- methods approach to understand how behavioral norms in schools are formed at the organizational level of the school, and are communicated, enacted, and reshaped in small groups. The extent to which these norms vary in small groups, or classrooms, impacts the conditions for learning within them. Currently the majority of school victimization research focuses patterns of behavior at the school-wide level, without accounting for variation in micro-level contexts within the school. I situate the classroom as a key site of interactions between students. I use the School Climate Understanding and Building Aspirations (SCUBA) Survey to capture patterns of victimization and students’ perceptions and attitudes related to personal aspirations and school-wide norms. I conducted ethnographic observations in two high schools across a full academic year to observe grounded interactions over time. I also conducted in-depth interviews with students sampled from the observed classrooms. I argue that three main cultural factors shape the context for aggression in schools and classrooms. These are 1) academic and aspirational norms; 2) disciplinary norms and practices; and 3) the everyday practices that develop in classrooms. Variation in observed aggressive behavior between schools is primarily shaped by these cultural factors. Within school variation is primarily shaped by how these cultural elements are enacted within local classroom idiocultures, which are differentiated according to the classroom’s academic tracking level, the teacher, and the peer group. This study provides a grounded understanding of the cultural roots of aggressive behavior, and expands our understanding of how victimization varies across and within schools. Future efforts to reduce student interpersonal aggression and improve learning conditions should include measurement protocols and interventions focused on the key cultural factors identified, which take place at both the school-wide and classroom levels.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Sociology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Bullying in schools
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_9511
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (407 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Alicia Raia-Hawrylak
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-vz7z-fg69
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Raia-Hawrylak
GivenName
Alicia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-09 05:10:11
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Alicia Raia-Hawrylak
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2020-01-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 31st, 2020.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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