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Multi hazard disaster resilience assessment

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TitleInfo
Title
Multi hazard disaster resilience assessment
SubTitle
methods and implementation
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chen
NamePart (type = given)
Xi
NamePart (type = date)
1994-
DisplayForm
Xi Chen
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Elsayed
NamePart (type = given)
Elsayed A.
DisplayForm
Elsayed A. Elsayed
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Guo
NamePart (type = given)
Weihong
DisplayForm
Weihong Guo
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Li
NamePart (type = given)
Kang
DisplayForm
Kang Li
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The continuous improvements in systems engineering and the unprecedented rate of technological advances not only take the quality and reliability engineering to the forefront, but also bring the large and complex engineered systems into practical use. On the one hand, the ever-rising expectations of the customers of the reliability of products and services have enhanced the design, operation and maintenance phases during their life cycles. Moreover, cascading effects, significant damages and interruptions of services caused by failures of large and complex systems, such as telecommunication networks, power grids, transportation systems, healthcare delivery systems, information systems, financial systems and supply chain systems, have aroused researchers' attention.

The last two decades have witnessed increasing reliance of these systems on computers, sensors, software and applications that have become targets of cyber attack and software failures with major consequences. Natural disasters and hazards such as floods, hurricanes and earthquakes particularly cause significant disruptions of the systems’ services. Restorations of their functionality under limited resources and time constraints have given rise to the assessment of such systems’ resilience. However, traditional reliability metrics are inadequate to assess the resilience characteristics in many applications and critical infrastructure sectors. Therefore, resilience as a new extension of reliability metrics has been gradually and widely used to evaluate the performance of large and complex systems.

Ideally, system recovery is “optimized” when all failed (and degraded) units are recovered immediately after the hazard; which is unrealistic due to the limited recovery resources and repair times needed to restore the system to its operational levels. Therefore, to recover system performance to a desired level within the shortest period, it becomes important to determine the sequence in which failed and degraded units are repaired sequentially (or simultaneously when possible). Specifically, it is necessary to obtain the criticality of the failed and degraded units during the recovery process and allocate the repair resources to the most important units which have the highest impact on the system recovery by using an importance measure (IM). IM is also used for identifying system design weakness and component (or subsystem) failures that are crucial to the system performance, and therefore determine the allocation of redundancy or repair resources to achieve system performance improvement.

In this thesis, we provide a detailed overview of potential hazards and methods of their predictions and quantification; we present several definitions of resilience as well as methods of its assessment in different applications; we also present the development of importance measures and compare them in different scenarios; we review cascading failure occurring in systems and models of their assessment and prevention. We propose general resilience metrics for non-repairable and repairable systems and demonstrate their estimation through applications. We finally propose approaches to prioritize units of the system in order of their importance to the system functions and to optimize the maintenance resources in order to recover system performance to a desired level within the shortest period.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Failure analysis (Engineering)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Repairing -- Estimates
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9446
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (153 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Xi Chen
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-69za-jr69
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Chen
GivenName
Xi
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-12-18 14:43:15
AssociatedEntity
Name
Xi Chen
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-03-14T13:23:08
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1.7
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