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Motivational control in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a neurobehavioral and translational account

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TitleInfo
Title
Motivational control in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a neurobehavioral and translational account
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ceceli
NamePart (type = given)
Ahmet Oğuz
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
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Ahmet Oğuz Ceceli
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
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Tricomi
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
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Elizabeth Tricomi
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Delgado
NamePart (type = given)
Mauricio R.
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Mauricio R. Delgado
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rosenberg-Lee
NamePart (type = given)
Miriam
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Miriam Rosenberg-Lee
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Myers
NamePart (type = given)
Catherine E.
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Catherine E. Myers
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
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school
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Text
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theses
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2019
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2019-05
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2019
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) poses debilitating impairments in the neurobehavioral systems governing reward learning and processing—key components involved in the control of motivated behaviors. Specifically, ADHD may rely on a system favoring cue-driven habits—rooted in the posterior putamen—over caudate and prefrontal cortex-driven goal-directed behaviors. Impaired motivational control may accompany corticostriatal dysfunction in ADHD (e.g., altered connectivity and striatal recruitment). A comprehensive investigation of habits is necessary to reveal potential motivational control irregularities that may be associated with ADHD. However, although contemporary tools enable the study of habit formation, examining existing habits and their disruption has not garnered comparable interest, necessitating the development of novel methods to capture well-learned habits. This dissertation discusses the neurobehavioral mechanisms of habit formation in ADHD in Study 1, develops a novel Go/NoGo task that capitalizes on existing green-Go and red-NoGo associations to study well-learned habit expression and disruption in Study 2, and applies these new tools to investigate habit expression and disruption as a function of ADHD symptomology in Study 3. In Study 1, despite similarities in behavioral assays of habit formation across groups, adults with ADHD displayed corticostriatal connectivity abnormalities and the hyper-recruitment of the posterior putamen during reward learning, alluding to a neural signature of impaired top-down control. In Study 2, participants exhibited outcome-insensitive habits when managing the Go/NoGo task, in that green-Go and red-NoGo associations elicited impairments in accuracy when incongruent with daily experiences. These habits were broken when participants were provided performance-tracking information paired with extrinsic reward, electing motivational enhancement via feedback as a candidate strategy for restoring goal-directed control. In Study 3, the novel task evoked well-learned habit expression and disruption independent of ADHD symptomology in the general population, although a modest association between hyperactivity and the prepotency to execute well-learned habits was evident. In sum, these studies suggest that ADHD presents corticostriatal abnormalities during motivational control, provide novel tools to better examine well-established habits and their disruption, and highlight the importance of investigating motivational systems in ADHD to better understanding its pathophysiology.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
ADHD
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
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ETD_9910
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-qkcf-vv95
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application/pdf
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Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 178 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Location
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NjNbRU
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ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ceceli
GivenName
Ahmet
MiddleName
Oğuz
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-04-25 17:19:14
AssociatedEntity
Name
Ahmet Ceceli
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-04-25T16:57:06
DateCreated (point = start); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-04-25T16:57:06
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