Staff View
Stabilizing information content in DNA evidence to improve lab-to-lab inference

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Stabilizing information content in DNA evidence to improve lab-to-lab inference
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Malek
NamePart (type = given)
Laura
NamePart (type = date)
1994-
DisplayForm
Laura Malek
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shain
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
DisplayForm
Daniel Shain
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Grgicak
NamePart (type = given)
Catherine
DisplayForm
Catherine Grgicak
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Butler
NamePart (type = given)
Monroe
DisplayForm
Monroe Butler
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hutley
NamePart (type = given)
Ja'Neisha
DisplayForm
Ja'Neisha Hutley
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract
Biological evidence acquired from crime scenes often contains mixtures of partial genomes from an unknown number of cells from any number of unknown contributors. Therefore, assessing the probability that a person contributed to an evidentiary item becomes a complicated combinatorial challenge, which is made more difficult in the presence of extraneous signal originating from random allele drop-in events or stutter artifacts. Not only does forensic DNA signal consist of extraneous signal, but it may exhibit significant levels of allele non-detection, often referred to as allele drop-out. Given these two sources of drop-out and the desire to stabilize inference results between laboratories, it is of interest to develop laboratory protocols aimed at reducing 1) drop-out due to sampling effects; and 2) drop-out due to detection effects.
In Phase I of the project we determined, through a DNA simulator named ValiDNA, that the optimal analytical conditions consisted of 29 PCR cycles and a 25 second injection. Once optimal analytical conditions were determined, a variety of collection/extraction pipelines were evaluated. In particular, cutting versus swabbing techniques were tested, as were silica and direct-to-PCR extraction methods. Notably, coupling a cotton swab collection with a silica-based extraction forces DNA volume partitions be processed through to PCR, while the FLOQSwab® and PicoPure® method is a ‘direct-to-PCR’ method that does not fractionate the extract. Experimentation demonstrated that there was not a significant difference between the four pre-PCR processes tested.
In conclusion, this work demonstrates that stabilizing the DNA signal acquired through PCR-based techniques is possible through the implementation of a simulation-based approach, using the laboratories’ own data to parameterize an in-silico DNA laboratory. Notably, if all laboratories choose parameters that render consistent detection of a single-copy of DNA, the evidentiary signal between laboratories will contain the same information contents, substantially improving evidential inference at a national scale. Additionally, using optimal analytical pipelines clearly demonstrates that direct PCR methods are not necessarily beneficial when attempting low-copy number interpretation; rather, multiple replicate amplifications of DNA rendered from a swab-silica pre-PCR pipeline is preferred.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
DNA
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
DNA fingerprinting
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Forensic genetics
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_10003
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note
Supplementary File: STR Insertion and Deletion due to Strand Slippage
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 62 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-2eh1-rh05
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Malek
GivenName
Laura
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-05-07 20:57:44
AssociatedEntity
Name
Laura Malek
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.4
ApplicationName
Mac OS X 10.13.6 Quartz PDFContext
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-05-11T01:02:02
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-05-11T01:02:02
RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL2)
ContentModel
ETD
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-06-13T21:16:26
BasicImageCharacteristics
ImageWidth
473
ImageHeight
354
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021