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Do concept-maps serve as an appropriate scaffold for problem-based learning environments?

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TitleInfo
Title
Do concept-maps serve as an appropriate scaffold for problem-based learning environments?
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Wichtel-Myles
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Suzanne C.
NamePart (type = date)
1984-
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Suzanne C. Wichtel-Myles
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
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O'Donnell
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Angela
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Angela O'Donnell
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Chinn
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Clark
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Clark Chinn
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Golan Duncan
NamePart (type = given)
Ravit
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Ravit Golan Duncan
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Manente
NamePart (type = given)
Christopher
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Christopher Manente
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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NamePart
Graduate School of Education
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school
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Text
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theses
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2019
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2019-05
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2019
Language
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English
Abstract
Collaborative learning designs, such as problem-based learning (PBL), have the potential to help students build valuable team-based professional skills needed for life after schooling within higher-educational settings (Desimone, 2009; Savery, 2006); however, motivating students to work together to successfully achieve outcomes often proves challenging. Research has shown that high-quality socially shared regulation (SSR) can improve these outcomes, but research is limited in determining the best instructional practices, and scaffolds, for fostering interdependence and sustained collaboration. The purpose of this study was to use Belland, Kim, and Hannafin's (2013) framework for designing scaffolds, that aims to improve on motivation and cognition, to extend previous research conducted by Manente (2014) and Rogat & Linnenbrink-Garcia (2011; 2013), and determine whether incorporating concept maps into PBL tasks would improve student performance and increase the frequency and quality of SSR. This mixed methods study took place within an educational psychology course at a large university. Participants were 16 undergraduate sophomore and graduate students who were divided into 4 groups, trained in the use of concept maps, and then engaged in three PBL conditions during the semester-PBL-Independent, PBL-Positive Interdependence, and PBL-High Positive Interdependence. Quantitative analyses of student scores on problem solutions and comprehension assessment scores showed students had the highest scores in the PBL-High Positive Interdependence condition. This study showed that the addition of concept maps contributed to the improvement of student scores on comprehension assessments, by comparing students' performance with students' performance on comprehension assessments from Manente's (2014) study. Qualitative analysis of group interactions showed that groups exhibited high quality SSR during the PBL-High Positive Interdependence condition, and processes of task planning, content planning and content monitoring were the most frequently used across groups. Overall, findings supported the use of concept maps as a tool to increase the effectiveness of PBL and students SSR and effective group skills. Areas of future exploration were also identified, including but not limited to, examining the degree to which concept maps impact cognitive load, and determining ways to effectively and gradually fade out hard scaffolds in order to promote independence.
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Problem-based learning
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Design of Learning Contexts
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Concept mapping
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social groups
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9694
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 242 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001500001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-66hg-0h47
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Wichtel-Myles
GivenName
Suzanne
MiddleName
C.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-04-06 10:39:06
AssociatedEntity
Name
Suzanne C. Wichtel-Myles
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-04-10T16:26:15
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2019-04-10T16:26:15
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