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A metabolomic exploration of the exercise response: acute aerobic and anaerobic exercise responses in endurance and resistance trained males and females

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TitleInfo
Title
A metabolomic exploration of the exercise response: acute aerobic and anaerobic exercise responses in endurance and resistance trained males and females
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pellegrino
NamePart (type = given)
Joseph Kenneth
NamePart (type = date)
1979-
DisplayForm
Joseph Kenneth Pellegrino
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Arent
NamePart (type = given)
Shawn M
DisplayForm
Shawn M Arent
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Anthony
NamePart (type = given)
Tracy
DisplayForm
Tracy Anthony
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McKeever
NamePart (type = given)
Kenneth
DisplayForm
Kenneth McKeever
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Malinowski
NamePart (type = given)
Karyn
DisplayForm
Karyn Malinowski
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-05
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Exercise acts as a potent modifier of metabolic status both acutely and through adaptations from chronic participation in physical activity. Changes in metabolism elicited by exercise manifest across systems throughout the body and impact health and fitness status of the individual. Metabolomics has proven a sensitive measure in investigating these perturbations in the context of acute and chronic changes. Here, our aim was to apply a metabolomics approach in order to characterize differences in the responses to both aerobic and anaerobic exercise, as well as to investigate the roles of training background and sex on these responses. Participants (N=40) were equally distributed into groups based on sex (M/F) and training background [endurance (END) or resistance- trained (RES)]. Participants performed 45-minute cycling (AE) or weight-training (AN) bouts on separate days. Serum was collected before (T0), immediately after (T1), and 60-min post-exercise (T2) and an analyzed via UHPLC/MS by Metabolon for identification of 754 known individual metabolites. A variety of statistical techniques, including clustering, pathway mapping and RM-ANOVAs were performed for data analysis. Both exercise conditions served to significantly alter the metabolome of all participants, with bioenergetic pathways predominating the response (TCA Cycle, purine salvage, substrate metabolism). Between conditions individual metabolic pathways differed by magnitude and/or timing of response, but not direction. At T1, changes within fatty acid metabolism were larger and more extensive in response to AE, while AN elicited greater perturbations in carbohydrate and anaerobic metabolites. However, by T2, both exercises presented similar patterns of substrate use, relying heavily on fatty acid oxidation. Inflammatory signaling, oxidative stress and energy balance all indicated greater stress at T2 following AN than AE. Principle components analysis was unable to discern between either END and RES or M and F groups at T0. Further, resting metabolomes were only significantly different at 3% and 1% of metabolites by training background or sex respectively (p < 0.05, q < 0.1). In response to exercise, training background differences were characterized by larger responses from the group more familiar with each exercise bout (END-AD, RES-AN) and a generally faster recovery for END as compared to RES following both exercises, and particularly AE. Thus, training background comparisons recapitulated differences observed between acute sessions. Sex differences were highlighted in substrate selection. Fatty acid use during AE (change T0-T1) was greater in F than M while amino acid catabolism, glycolytic flux and purine salvage were greater during AN in M than F. These results present the first direct comparisons of the metabolomic response to exercise across sex and/or training background for AE and AN. We report both similarities and differences in the exercise response between mode (AE/AN), training status (END/RES) and sex. Despite observed phenotypic differences between groups, groups exhibited a uniform resting metabotype and comparable responses across training background and sex. These observations illustrate the potency of regular participation in physical activity of any kind in normalizing the metabolome at rest and in response to exercise. They further suggest the possibility of a healthy resting metabotype and, a characteristic metabolomic signature in response to AE and AN in active individuals.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Metabolomics
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Nutritional Sciences
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Exercise tests
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9624
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 236 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-tcy3-yh84
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Pellegrino
GivenName
Joseph
MiddleName
Kenneth
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-03-28 18:47:27
AssociatedEntity
Name
Joseph Pellegrino
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2021-05-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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2019-03-28T18:46:16
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-03-28T18:46:16
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