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Legitimized fraud and the state-corporate criminology of food - a Spectrum-based theory

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Legitimized fraud and the state-corporate criminology of food - a Spectrum-based theory
Name (authority = orcid); (authorityURI = http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/identifiers/orcid.html); (type = personal); (valueURI = http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6754-6137)
NamePart (type = family)
Leon
NamePart (type = given)
Kenneth Sebastian
Affiliation
Latino & Hispanic Caribbean Studies, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ken
NamePart (type = given)
Ivy
Affiliation
George Washington University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Latino & Hispanic Caribbean Studies
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) (New Brunswick)
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2019
Abstract (type = Abstract)
The role that food corporations have in determining our health and nutrition is concomitant with the power and influence that corporations exercise across all commercial sectors. These large, powerful, and often multinational entities – collectively referred to as Big Food – employ a robust array of strategies to advance the organizational interests associated with a seemingly paradoxical business model: securing the continuous and ever-growing consumption of food products increasingly associated with negative health outcomes. As this model proliferates globally, the implications of this contradiction warrant specific attention to the activities of Big Food corporations through a critical criminological framework. The pervasive and increasingly legitimized activity of Big Food relies on a legal, regulatory, and moral framework that allows for the relegation of all non-market oriented value systems to be secondary to a pro-corporatist ideological and moral superstructure. Whereas previous scholarship has contributed to an understanding of what occurs when profit-maximization values collide with – and then co-opt – public health and nutrition interests, the present study offers a spectrum-based theory to explain how various degrees of food fraud are systematically incentivized by the legal privileges of corporations and the hegemonic moral economy of neoliberal governance.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
1 online resource (43 pages)
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Food crime
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Fraud
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Food justice
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Corporate crime
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
AssociatedObject
Name
Crime, Law and Social Change
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Detail
25-46
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
71
Reference (type = url)
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10611-018-9787-6
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Leon, Kenneth Sebastian
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30267700001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-fn50-a866
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (TYPE = [FS] statement #1); (ID = rulibRdec0004)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers.Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work.I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others.I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work.By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (point = start); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-09-08
DateTime (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-08-08
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the publisher's request. It will be publicly available after August 8, 2019.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
CreatingApplication
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1.4
ApplicationName
Acrobat Distiller 9.0.0 (Windows)
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-02-03T09:30:59
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-02-04T10:31:08
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