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The effects of space and energy on parasite communities

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TitleInfo
Title
The effects of space and energy on parasite communities
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Grunberg
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Rita L.
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1990-
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Rita L. Grunberg
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author
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Morin
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Peter J
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Peter J Morin
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
John-Alder
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Henry
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Henry John-Alder
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Winfree
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Rachael
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Rachael Winfree
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Zelmer
NamePart (type = given)
Derek
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Derek Zelmer
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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2019
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2019-10
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Parasites are ubiquitous in nature, and yet their contribution to biodiversity and ecosystem processes is poorly understood. This knowledge gap has provoked a plea to include parasites into ecosystem ecology. Still, incorporating parasites into our purview of ecology is a nuanced task because it requires the careful consideration of the spatial scale of host-parasite interactions and the use of common ecological currencies. In this dissertation, I explore the effects of host community structure, spatial scales and energetics on patterns in parasite assemblages.
First, I test for concordance between the patterns of similarity of parasite assemblages, host communities and environmental factors. I used multivariate tests to assess if parasite assemblages mirror changes that occur along a stream width gradient in two riverine ecosystems. Overall, I observed no concordance between patterns in parasites and hosts assemblages suggesting that parasites and their hosts are not responding similarly to changes in environmental factors that occur along rivers.
Next, I contrast patterns in parasite body size-density relationships at different spatial scales to highlight scale sensitivity in macroecological patterns. Here, I varied the focus of the analysis (e.g. local and global) and spatial grain of the data (e.g. parasite populations nested within their host or within an ecosystem). At local scales, I found wide variation in the relationship between parasite density and body size, while the global analysis generally fit the pattern posited by theory. However, this result was also contingent on how parasite populations were delineated. Given these results, I advocate for a more consistent use of spatial scales that reflect the processes generating the pattern being tested.
Last, I extend ideas from the metabolic theory of ecology to develop scaling relationships that explain the energetics of parasite communities nested within their hosts and ecosystems. Across host species, I found parasite community-level energetics scales allometrically with host energetics. At the ecosystem-level, wide variation in parasite productivity is better explained by host productivity rather than host biomass measures, suggesting that accounting for variation in how hosts and parasite use energy need to be considered in the future.
My research approach broadly demonstrates ways to link parasite diversity and energetics to their hosts across biological scales and provides new avenues of research to incorporate parasites into metabolic theory.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Allometry
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Parasites -- Variation
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_10231
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application/pdf
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Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 125 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-z871-mf40
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Grunberg
GivenName
Rita
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-09-10 14:36:19
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Name
Rita Grunberg
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2020-10-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2020.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-09-10T14:33:04
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2019-09-10T14:33:04
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