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The effects of α-GPC supplementation on growth hormone, fat loss, and body composition in overweight adults

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Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Maldonado
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William G.
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1994-
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William G. Maldonado
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author
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Arent
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Shawn M
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Shawn M Arent
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Campbell
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Sara
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Sara Campbell
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McKeever
NamePart (type = given)
Kenneth
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Kenneth McKeever
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-10
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
In the United States, there is an increasing prevalence of obesity that is associated with health risks, and, as such, the need for effective weight loss methods is becoming increasingly more important. In the elderly, α-GPC has been shown to significantly increase growth hormone (GH) concentrations, a major stimulator of lipolysis and protein synthesis. However, very little work has been done in younger individuals. PURPOSE: to investigate if α-GPC, an acetylcholine precursor, could confer additional GH or weight loss benefits to active, overweight individuals while exercise and nutrition are maintained. METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to either α-GPC (n=15, Mage=25.8±9.1y, MBF%=35.48±1.75%) or placebo (n=13 Mage=24.4±10.4y, MBF%=35.65±1.98%) after health/fitness screening. Both groups were instructed to consume two capsules of their respective supplement for a total of 1200 mg/day, one dose before their workout or on non-workout days with their midday meal, and the second dose before going to sleep, for eight weeks. Assessments were performed pre- and post-supplementation and included resting blood pressure and heart rate, activity level via Framingham Physical Activity Index (F-score), body composition via air-displacement plethysmography (fat mass [FM], fat free mass [FFM[, body fat percentage [BF%], body mass [BM]), and girth measurements (waist, hips). Additionally, blood samples were obtained for analysis of growth hormone (GH). Throughout the duration of the study participants were instructed to maintain their current activity level and diet. During the weeks leading up to pre- and post-testing, daily caloric intake was reported using MyFitnesspal. RM-MANOVAs with univariate follow-ups were conducted to determine differences between groups over the course of the trial with significance set at P<0.05. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between groups for any body composition, girth measurements, GH, caloric intake, or F-score from pre- to post-intervention (P>0.05). There were significant main Time effects for decreases in BF%, FM, and waist measurements (P<0.05) as well as trends for decreased BM (P=0.094) and increased FFM (P=0.064). No main effects were observed for any other variable (P>0.05). Univariate follow-ups showed a significant Time-by-Group interaction for an increase in SBP in the α-GPC group (P<0.05). A negative trend was seen for total daily caloric intake among all subjects over time (P=0.066, ES=0.136). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, supplementation with α-GPC alone under the conditions of this study did not result in additional body mass loss, alterations in body composition, or changes in GH, when compared to a placebo. This study did show that the act of tracking diet may have been sufficient to alter behavior, however more research is required. As such a future direction should investigate if tracking diet in conjunction with maintained exercise is sufficient to produce significant body composition changes.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Kinesiology and Applied Physiology
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Obesity
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_10240
PhysicalDescription
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application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (v, 41 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
TitleInfo
Title
The effects of α-GPC supplementation on growth hormone, fat loss, and body composition in overweight adults
TitleInfo (type = alternative)
Title
The effects of alpha-GPC supplementation on growth hormone, fat loss, and body composition in overweight adults
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-qgqq-ff53
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Maldonado
GivenName
William
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-09-17 16:06:58
AssociatedEntity
Name
William Maldonado
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-09-13T08:33:22
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2019-09-13T08:33:22
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