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Environment under the gun: literature and environmentalism in Cold War Central America

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TitleInfo
Title
Environment under the gun: literature and environmentalism in Cold War Central America
Name (type = personal)
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Price
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Jacob Goaslind
NamePart (type = date)
1990-
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Jacob Goaslind Price
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author
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Marcone
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Jorge
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Jorge Marcone
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Schwartz
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Marcy
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Marcy Schwartz
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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NamePart (type = family)
Stevens
NamePart (type = given)
Camilla
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Camilla Stevens
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Handley
NamePart (type = given)
George
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George Handley
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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2019
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2019-10
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2019
Language
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation explores how Central American poets reinterpret both the political, historical, and cultural value of landscapes that were devastated by new political, economic, and international military governmental policy that coincided with the Cold War. By examining environmentally engaged literature produced between the 1950s and 1990s in Central America, I elucidate how ecological paradigms shifted in the face of North American military, economic, and environmental intervention. The cases of the CIA-led Guatemalan coup in 1954, the Sandinista victory in Nicaragua in 1979, and the Mayan genocide of the 1980s constitute rallying points around which Central American authors renegotiate how humans interact with the environment. Their literary output encapsulates the varied historical and environmental results of anthropogenesis in both Western and indigenous cultures. Authors restructure the political ecology of their respective countries and the fundamental place of humans in nature. Their works reflect changes in environmental history, anti-capitalism, ecotourism, genocide, and indigeneity outside of traditional binary definitions of the Cold War that showcase the inherent contradictions in the capitalist promise of modernization and human prosperity. The tangible consequences of the Cold War manifested through Civil Wars and intense environmental degradation, especially throughout the 1970s and 1980s, led writers to challenge the traditional, Western relationship between humans and nonhumans. I examine Central American poets who witnessed the ecological repercussions of the Cold War inscribe into their how nonhumans suffered and questioned how nonhumans responded to their polluted and destroyed environments. Several Nicaraguan writers who published texts close to the Sandinista revolution recognized the potential for nonhumans to collaborate in human politics and imbued them with agency. Indigenous publications from the 1990s exemplify a reflective and meta-poetic transition away from Cold War ideologies. These works contribute to global discussions surrounding land proprietorship and nonhuman subjectivity by challenging traditional Cold War understanding of nature. Their work represents how a variety of Mayan ontologies understand the implications of genocide and ecocide that resulted from the Cold War beyond the global division between East and West. I conclude that one of the tenets of Cold War ideology that necessarily leads to environmental degradation is the North American discourse of security, which transformed Cold War anxieties into the War on Drugs and furthered economic practices that jeopardize ecological welfare in Latin America.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Spanish
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Environmentalism in literature
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Latin American poetry
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_10337
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (v, 171 pages)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-q72x-qh51
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
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Price
GivenName
Jacob
Role
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RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
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2019-09-26 00:44:58
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Name
Jacob Price
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2020-05-01
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 1st, 2020.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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