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Micro-pursuit and strategies of allocating attention during visual tasks with moving targets

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TitleInfo
Title
Micro-pursuit and strategies of allocating attention during visual tasks with moving targets
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wang
NamePart (type = given)
Jie
NamePart (type = date)
1994-
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Jie Wang
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kowler
NamePart (type = given)
Eileen
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Eileen Kowler
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Feldman
NamePart (type = given)
Jacob
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Jacob Feldman
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Singh
NamePart (type = given)
Manish
DisplayForm
Manish Singh
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Santos
NamePart (type = given)
Elio
DisplayForm
Elio Santos
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Eye movements are often studied in the context of demanding visual tasks in which goals are achieved on the basis of the visual information gathered from sequence of fixations (Hayhoe, 2017). Much less attention has been devoted to how smooth pursuit is used during visual or visuomotor tasks. Prior studies investigated the link between smooth pursuit eye movements and manual interception. Results showed that pursuing a moving target was beneficial to estimate the time of the interception and larger tracking errors resulted in larger interception errors (Brenner and Smeets, 2011; Fooken et. al., 2016). The present study examined eye movement strategies and perceptual performance in a demanding visual task involving moving targets (discs), modeled after the judgments at traffic circles. The task required judgments of relative motions of two targets heading to a common meeting point, specifically, how much faster is one target relative to the other. The questions intended to be resolved are, what is the eye strategy used spontaneously during the course of the motion, and is the chosen eye strategy indeed the better eye strategy to use while judging the relative motions? Two motion discrimination tasks were assigned by blocks to all four subjects: (1) the which-first task requiring judging which disc would arrive the meeting point first and (2) the more challenging collision task requiring judging which disc would arrive first and whether the two discs would collide at the meeting point. Collision was defined as any overlapping of two discs. Subjects performed both tasks under a free-viewing condition, in which they received no instructions about where to look or whether to pursue either moving disc (Experiment 1). Perceptual results show that people can precisely judge the relative motions, with Weber fractions ranging from 3-6%. Three-dimensional representations were created showing the distributions of both averaged horizontal eye position (x-axis) and horizontal eye velocity (y-axis) at different epochs of time. This novel analysis allows comparisons between eye velocities and positions over time so that the sources of position change (saccades or pursuit) can be distinguished. Eye movement results show that the preferred eye strategy was to fixate near the meeting point and pursue the pair of the discs after the decision was made, anticipating the motion of the paired discs on the last lag of the display. The influences of the standard disc velocity and the comparison disc velocity on the averaged eye velocity at different representative times suggest that fixate was achieved at least in part by dividing attention between discs moving in opposite directions during the time the decision was being made. To better capture the effectiveness of the preferred eye strategy. All subjects performed the same tasks with the strategies determined by instructions (Experiment 2): (1) fixating near the meeting point or (2) switching between discs while making decisions. Performance of all four subjects showed precise discrimination for both tasks (which-first and collision) and both eye strategies (fixate and switch), with Weber fractions ranging from 2-5%. Better discrimination was obtained with the fixate strategy (2.94%) than the switch eye strategy (4.14%). Results were consistent in the collision task, indicating the fixate strategy led to better discrimination when judging the relative motion of the two discs heading toward the same meeting point.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Visual perception -- Testing
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_10253
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 49 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-dq33-2p53
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Wang
GivenName
Jie
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-09-16 23:17:07
AssociatedEntity
Name
Jie Wang
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2020-10-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2020.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-10-07T23:38:26
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-10-07T23:38:26
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