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To study, to party, or both? Assessing risk factors for non-prescribed stimulant use among middle and high school students

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
To study, to party, or both? Assessing risk factors for non-prescribed stimulant use among middle and high school students
Name (authority = orcid); (authorityURI = http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/identifiers/orcid.html); (type = personal); (valueURI = http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6754-6137)
NamePart (type = family)
León
NamePart (type = given)
Kenneth Sebastian
Affiliation
Latino & Hispanic Caribbean Studies, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Martínez
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel E.
Affiliation
University of Arizona
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Latino & Hispanic Caribbean Studies
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) (New Brunswick)
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
Journal article
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Abstract (type = Abstract)
This study examines the risk factors predicting non-prescribed stimulant use (NPSU) among adolescents, with an emphasis on whether such factors are reflective of instrumental (e.g. studying) and/or recreational (e.g. partying) drug consumption settings. Using data from Monitoring the Future (2011), we employed a series of logistic regression models to establish predictors of 12-month self-reported Adderall or Ritalin use without a doctor’s note among 8th and 10th graders. Whereas studies of college students have found NPSU to correlate with instrumental motives and productivity-related demands, we find no association between NPSU and indicators of academic strain for this younger sample. Rather, we find that the age of onset and current use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana is most predictive of NPSU, which are substances generally associated with social and recreational consumption settings. These findings have potential implications for practitioners concerned with mitigating the harms of general prescription drug misuse, as interventions efforts informed by research conducted among college students may not readily apply to younger populations. Drawing from central tenets of developmental and life course criminology, we call for continued inquiry into the broader socialization and developmental processes that influence NPSU and other prescription drug use patterns prior to early adulthood.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
1 online resource (31 pages)
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Prescription stimulants
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Adderall
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Ritalin
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Adolescent drug use
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2017
AssociatedObject
Name
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Detail
22-30
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
49(1)
Reference (type = url)
https://doi.org/10.1080/02791072.2016.1260187
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Leon, Kenneth Sebastian
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30267700001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-ds97-bz63
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (TYPE = [FS] statement #1); (ID = rulibRdec0004)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers.Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work.I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others.I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work.By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
CreatingApplication
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1.3
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macOS Version 10.15.4 (Build 19E287) Quartz PDFContext
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-04-20T17:16:16
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-04-20T17:16:16
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