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Lingering legacies and emerging progress: explaining gender quota adoption in Central and Eastern Europe

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TitleInfo
Title
Lingering legacies and emerging progress: explaining gender quota adoption in Central and Eastern Europe
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vojvodić
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Anja
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1983
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Anja Vojvodić
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author
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Mona Lena
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Mona Lena Krook
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Sanbonmatsu
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Kira
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Kira Sanbonmatsu
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Kubik
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Jan
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Jan Kubik
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Feinberg
NamePart (type = given)
Melissa
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Melissa Feinberg
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Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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2020
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2020-05
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Immediately after the fall of communism women’s representation in Central and Eastern European Parliaments fell precipitously, from roughly 30% to 10%, and below that in certain countries. Currently, the percentage of women in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) is 26% (among 19 countries surveyed). This increase is partly due to the adoption of gender quotas in CEE countries. Quotas are usually defined as voluntary or legal provisions adopted by countries or political parties in order to increase the percentage of women in Parliaments or other influential bodies, such as corporate boards. Gender quotas broadly fall into three types: reserved seats, legislated quotas and voluntary party quotas. Reserved seats usually refer to parliamentary seats being allocated solely for women; legislated quotas are constitutional or electoral laws that mandate a minimum percentage of women on electoral lists; and voluntary party quotas are provisions that political parties include in statutes that set a specific target for inclusion of women on party electoral lists. Among the CEE countries I research in this dissertation, 16 of 19 have a gender quota. Three countries have no gender quota. Noting this disparity in terms of gender quota adoption across the region, I ask the question: why do certain countries of CEE adopt gender quotas and why do others not adopt them? To answer this question, I explore regional trends and subsequently focus on four key countries as illustrative case studies (Serbia, Poland, Czech Republic and Latvia). I dedicate two chapters to in-depth explorations of Serbia and Poland. I dedicate the last chapter to an examination of non-adopters, which includes brief case studies on Czech Republic and Latvia. Methodologically, I approach this dissertation qualitatively. Descriptive statistics are mostly used for contextualization. I rely on fieldwork completed in Serbia and Poland, in addition to 35 interviews completed with relevant elite actors across the region. Generally, I find support for my overall argument. Namely, gender quota adoption is aided by two key factors: the mobilization and activity of women’s groups in CEE who advocate for gender quotas and the various, context-dependent political opportunities that become available to them. These political opportunities are often related to post-conflict reforms, symbolic European Union (EU) influence or favorable domestic laws. This dissertation contributes to the overall literature on gender quotas by including a less-studied region, namely CEE. My argument that active women’s groups exist in CEE and can influence policy also counters some of the previous literature on this subject that posited that women’s groups were not previously influential in the region.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Women and politics
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Women -- Political activity -- Europe, Eastern
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Women -- Political activity -- Europe, Central
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Political Science
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_10804
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application/pdf
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Extent
1 online resource (x, 228 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-mrg8-9915
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Vojvodic
GivenName
Anja
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Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
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2020-04-22 17:51:47
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Name
Anja Vojvodic
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2020-04-27T20:40:38
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2020-04-27T20:40:38
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