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The utility of cognitive testing in the nurse anesthesia admission process as a novel predictor of situational awareness and academic success

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Title
The utility of cognitive testing in the nurse anesthesia admission process as a novel predictor of situational awareness and academic success
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Guy
NamePart (type = given)
Shannon C.
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
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Shannon C. Guy
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author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lion
NamePart (type = given)
Danielle M.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pallaria
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas
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Thomas Pallaria
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Advisory Committee
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chair
Name (type = personal)
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McLaughlin
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Michael
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Michael McLaughlin
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Advisory Committee
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co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bagchi
NamePart (type = given)
Ann
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Ann Bagchi
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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co-chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Nursing - RBHS
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school
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Text
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theses
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2020
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2020-05
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Purpose of Project: In the clinical setting, loss situational awareness (SA) by anesthesia practitioners can lead to medical error with grave and costly consequences. Thus, society needs CRNAs who practice with adequate levels of SA, which is the ability to perceive, understand and react to stressful situations so as to optimize patient outcomes. It is noted that a challenge in academia is predicting potential students’ abilities to develop SA, confounded by limited evidence-based admission criteria. Research indicates that one’s degree of SA is best predicted by cognition. To date, no research has observed the utility of cognitive testing in the SRNA admission process as a predictor of SA. Given the ultimate need to improve healthcare delivery, the purpose of this project is to assess an evidence-based, cognitive tool in the admission process to predict students’ SA and academic success.

Methodology: This study utilizes a quantitative, correlational design to examine participating nurse anesthesia interviewees’ cognitive results against the traditional admission indices. Of the 50 qualified nurse anesthesia interviewees, 37 voluntarily participated in this IRB-approved study at a large, public, northeast university. Following candidate interviews, participants completed the computerized Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM-III) to assess cognition, the results of which had no bearing on admission decision. Participant scores were uploaded and maintained within the secured Pearson’s online portal. The raw data was stripped of identifiers for blinded analysis via SPSS.

Results: Bivariate analysis found no significant differences in APM-III scores of those admitted versus those not admitted. Only interview scores demonstrated significant difference between groups, with those admitted being higher. No significant association was seen between scores for APM-III, interview, CCRN, GPA and years of experience. Mutivariate regression showed insignificant, negative associations between admission and CCRN score, GPA and years of experience. APM-III scores and interview score were insignificantly, positively correlated.

Implications for Practice: No difference between groups existed in APM-III scores and the majority of traditional criteria. Given the lack of evidential criteria and measures to assess cognition in the admission process, current practice alone may be more subjective than objective. Therefore, this metric may offer supplemental aid to best capture students with the most potential. Implications include the education and graduation of effective and efficient CRNAs. This may be an answer to concerns of attrition and associated program costs. More importantly, it may provide greater entry-to-practice of clinicians who embody the necessary trait of SA, thereby reducing the potential for medical error.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Healthcare/medicine
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Nurse Anesthesia
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_10691
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (78 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
DNP
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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School of Nursing (RBHS) DNP Projects
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rucore10004500001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-8g47-b697
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Guy
GivenName
Shannon
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
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Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-04-03 13:02:50
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Name
Shannon Guy
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Nursing - RBHS
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2022-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31st, 2022.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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