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Let the robot do it for me: assessing voice as a modality for visual analytics for novice users

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Let the robot do it for me: assessing voice as a modality for visual analytics for novice users
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pulliza
NamePart (type = given)
Jonathan Luis
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
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Jonathan Luis Pulliza
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shah
NamePart (type = given)
Chirag
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Chirag Shah
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
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Nina
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Nina Wacholder
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Aakhus
NamePart (type = given)
Mark
DisplayForm
Mark Aakhus
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tory
NamePart (type = given)
Melanie
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Melanie Tory
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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2020
DateOther (type = degree); (qualifier = exact); (encoding = w3cdtf)
2020-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
The growth of Visual Analytics (VA) systems has been driven by the need to explore and understand large datasets across many domains. Applications such as Tableau were developed with the goal of better supporting novice users to generate data visualizations and complete their tasks. However, novice users still face many challenges in using VA systems, especially in complex tasks outside of simple trend identification, such as exploratory tasks. Many of the issues stem from the novice users’ inability to reconcile their questions or representations of the data with the visualizations presented using the interactions provided by the system.

With the improvement in natural language processing technology and the increased prevalence of voice interfaces, there is a renewed interest in developing voice interactions for VA systems. The goal is to enable users to ask questions directly to the system or to indicate specific actions using natural language, which may better facilitate access to functions available in the VA system. Previous approaches have tended to build systems in a screen-only environment in order to encourage interaction through voice. Though they did produce significant results and guidance for the technical challenges of voice in VA, it is important to understand how the use of a voice system would affect novice users within their most common context instead of moving them into new environments. It is also important to understand when a novice user would choose to use a voice modality when the traditional keyboard and mouse modality is also available.

This study is an attempt to understand the circumstances under which novice users of a VA system would choose to interact with using their voice in a traditional desktop environment, and whether the voice system better facilitates access to available functionalities. Given the users choose the voice system, do they choose different functions than those with only a keyboard and a mouse? Using a Wizard of Oz set up in the place of an automated voice system, we find that the participants chose to use the voice system because of its convenience, ability to get a quick start on their work, and in some situations where they could not find a specific function in the interface. Overall function choices were not found to be significantly different between those who had access to the voice system versus those who did not, though there were a few cases where participants were able to access less common functions compared to a control group. Participants refrained from choosing voice because their previous experiences with voice systems had led them to believe all voice systems were not capable of addressing their task needs. They also felt using the voice system was incongruent with gaining mastery of the underlying VA system, as the convenience of using the voice system could lead to its use as a crutch. Participants then often chose to struggle with the visual interface instead of using the voice system for assistance.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Visual analytics
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_11136
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 167 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-rq3n-zz18
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Pulliza
GivenName
Jonathan
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-09-09 19:22:38
AssociatedEntity
Name
Jonathan Pulliza
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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Microsoft® Word for Office 365
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-09-11T13:52:36
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-09-11T13:52:36
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