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Acceptability and efficacy of a single-session repetitive negative thinking intervention: a pilot study

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TitleInfo
Title
Acceptability and efficacy of a single-session repetitive negative thinking intervention: a pilot study
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hughes
NamePart (type = given)
Christopher David
NamePart (type = date)
1989-
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Christopher David Hughes
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author
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Shireen L
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Shireen L Rizvi
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Selby
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Edward A
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Edward A Selby
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Kleiman
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Evan M
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Evan M Kleiman
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ward-Ciesielski
NamePart (type = given)
Erin F
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Erin F Ward-Ciesielski
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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2020
DateOther (type = degree); (qualifier = exact); (encoding = w3cdtf)
2020-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Repetitive Negative Thinking (RNT) is a cognitive process that is repetitive, passive/unproductive, difficult to control, and focused predominantly on negative content. RNT has been identified as a transdiagnostic risk factor associated with the development and/or maintenance of a wide variety of psychological disorders and problematic behaviors. While evidence-based treatments exist that address RNT in some way, they are limited in their ability to reach the wide range of individuals experiencing problems with RNT.

The present study sought to develop a single-session mindfulness-based skills-training video aimed at reducing RNT and assess its acceptability and preliminary efficacy across multiple methods. Participants, adult community members screened for high trait RNT (n = 71), completed baseline questionnaires and scheduled an in-person lab visit. Participants were randomly assigned to either the active (skills-training) or the control (no skills training) condition. The intervention’s preliminary efficacy was then assessed by comparing the groups’ levels of RNT and Negative Affect (NA): following an RNT induction during the lab visit, over the course of a five-day Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) monitoring period, and self-reported at follow-up relative to baseline. The intervention’s acceptability was assessed based on participants expectations at the end of the lab visit, their momentary reports of skills use and perceived effectiveness, and their retrospective satisfaction and perceived utility of the intervention at follow-up.

Overall, results were promising for the intervention. The active condition demonstrated statistically and clinically significant and reliable reductions in RNT and NA at follow-up compared to baseline. They also reported less RNT and NA and more frequent and successful skills use over the course of the EMA monitoring period. However, we were unable to assess the impact of the skills training immediately after training in the lab because the RNT induction failed to induce RNT or NA in either condition. Finally, active condition participants reported finding the intervention acceptable across all three assessment timepoints.

These finding indicate that a single-session mindfulness-based skills-training intervention is acceptable and potentially efficacious in reducing RNT. Together with the intervention’s preliminary promise, its brevity, low cost, ability to be delivered online, and applicability to a wide range of populations, make this a promising intervention that warrants continued investigation, development, and refinement.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Repetitive negative thinking (RNT)
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_11261
PhysicalDescription
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 81 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-zrj0-8w69
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Hughes
GivenName
Christopher
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-09-30 15:37:14
AssociatedEntity
Name
Christopher Hughes
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-09-30T19:23:01
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2020-09-30T19:23:01
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