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The relationship between social-emotional learning skills (SEL) and peer-perceptions of leadership in a sample of underserved middle school youths

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TitleInfo
Title
The relationship between social-emotional learning skills (SEL) and peer-perceptions of leadership in a sample of underserved middle school youths
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wang
NamePart (type = given)
Angela Weiyi
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Angela Weiyi Wang
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Elias
NamePart (type = given)
Maurice J.
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Maurice J. Elias
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Selby
NamePart (type = given)
Edward
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Edward Selby
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Karlin
NamePart (type = given)
Robert
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Robert Karlin
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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2021
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2021-01
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2021
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English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Current thinking about 21st-century schools and civic involvement recognizes social-emotional competencies and character education as the groundwork of engaged citizenship and conscious leadership (Elias, 2009; Wilczenski & Coomey, 2007). Social emotional leaning (SEL), in the context of positive character, is essential to nurturing emerging young leaders to participate effectively in a global and highly politicized world where their performances are challenged in the numerous and multifaceted roles that contemporary leadership demands (Elias, 2009). Although there is substantial interest in youth leadership development as a vehicle to promote psychosocial development in adolescents, no studies have examined the relationship between SEL and peer perceptions of youth leadership.

This study evaluated this relationship in a group of 203 students in grades 6-8th from two diverse urban middle schools in NJ. Participants self-identified their race and ethnicity (38.9% Hispanic; 28.6% Black; 21.2% White; 10.3% Asian; 1.0% Others). The primary goal of the current study was to address several gaps in the youth leadership development literature by quantitatively assessing the role of social emotional learning (SEL) in peer perceived ethical leadership nominations in the context of urban middle schools. Focusing on peer perceptions of ethical leadership, I explored (a) the effect of teacher-rated SEL on predicting peer-nominated student leadership facets; (b) the mediating functionality of self-reported self-efficacy on SEL and peer-nominated student leadership facets; (c) the difference in effects of SEL on leadership between male- versus female-identifying students; and (d) the difference in effects of SEL on leadership between native English-speaking (L1) students versus non-native English-speaking (L2) students.

Results indicated that SEL had a significant and positive impact on peer-nominated student leadership, yet this relationship is not mediated through self-efficacy. In addition, results showed that gender moderated the relationship between SEL and leadership, such that SEL had a stronger positive effect for female students than it did for male students on leadership nominations in Spring 2016, but not Fall 2015. Moreover, SEL had a stronger positive effect on leadership for non-native English-speaking students than it did for native English speakers for both Fall 2015 and Spring 2016. These findings, their implications for theory and practice, study limitations, and future directions were explored.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Character education
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Mental health
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Peer-perception of leadership
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Social-emotional learning skills
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Underserved middle school youths
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Youth leadership development
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_11400
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application/pdf
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text/xml
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1 online resource (vii, 65 pages)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
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Includes bibliographical references
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School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-epyj-vk12
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RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Wang
GivenName
Angela
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2020-12-30 16:50:09
AssociatedEntity
Name
Angela Wang
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2021-01-05T20:18:02
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2021-01-05T20:18:02
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