Staff View
Neurobiological mechanisms of memory formation in the auditory forebrain of adult male zebra finches

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Neurobiological mechanisms of memory formation in the auditory forebrain of adult male zebra finches
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Furest Cataldo
NamePart (type = given)
Basilio
DisplayForm
Basilio Furest Cataldo
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jussim
NamePart (type = given)
Lee
DisplayForm
Lee Jussim
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact); (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes)
2021
DateOther (type = degree); (qualifier = exact); (encoding = w3cdtf)
2021-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2021
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Songbirds provide a powerful model for studying adult neuroplasticity in the auditory cortex as a function of recent auditory experience due to many parallels with the human auditory system, which is similarly tasked with processing complex conspecific vocalizations. As in human speech processing, lateralized auditory responses are evident in an area of the songbird’s higher auditory cortex, NCM (caudomedial nidopallium), that encodes specific auditory memories through a process of adaptation that leads to reduced responses to familiar sounds. The right NCM typically shows larger auditory responses than the left, suggesting lateral differences in auditory representations and memory. Furthermore, the songbird brain incorporates new neurons in adulthood, including in NCM. In this study, Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were continuously exposed to a novel heterospecific acoustic environment to confirm a previous report wherein NCM multi-unit activity undergoes dynamic shifts in lateralized activity and assess whether these transient shifts in activity are correlated with shifts in incorporation of new neurons. Bilateral NCM electrophysiology confirmed previous reports wherein left-hemisphere activity was elevated relative to the right after 9 days of exposure to a novel heterospecific acoustic environment, an effect that was not observed in a cohort exposed to the same environment for 30 days. A novel longitudinal measuring approach, via epidural recordings, revealed the timeline during which these transient shifts in lateralized activity occur. Finally, preliminary data suggests that there is an inverse relationship between the asymmetric electrophysiology and lateralized new neuron incorporation.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Lateralization
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Memory consolidation
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Cerebral dominance
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_11453
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vii, 75 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-agmb-kj06
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Furest Cataldo
GivenName
Basilio
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2021-01-06 14:09:45
AssociatedEntity
Name
Basilio Furest Cataldo
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.7
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2021-01-12T12:20:35
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2021-01-12T12:20:35
ApplicationName
Adobe Acrobat Pro DC 20.13.20074
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021