Staff View
Bureaucratic behavior at the frontline: three essays on the police and the public

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Bureaucratic behavior at the frontline: three essays on the police and the public
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kang
NamePart (type = given)
Inkyu
DisplayForm
Inkyu Kang
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Van Ryzin
NamePart (type = given)
Gregg
DisplayForm
Gregg G. Van Ryzin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Piotrowski
NamePart (type = given)
Suzanne J.
DisplayForm
Suzanne J. Piotrowski
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = local)
member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Porumbescu
NamePart (type = given)
Gregory A.
DisplayForm
Gregory A. Porumbescu
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = local)
member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Apel
NamePart (type = given)
Robert
DisplayForm
Robert Apel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = local)
member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (keyDate = yes)
2022
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (type = degree); (qualifier = exact)
2022-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2022
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
How can we motivate civil servants to behave in ways consistent with public demands? How can we address distrust in government that also inhibits performance of civil servants? This dissertation, which consists of three essays, builds on existing theories to address these big questions in public management from a street-level angle, with an empirical focus on policing. Chapter 2 explores how body-worn cameras shape police behavior, drawing on theories of bureaucratic accountability and control. Bayesian structural time-series modeling was employed to examine the New Orleans Police Department, an agency that was under pressure to improve frontline accountability. Results demonstrate that recording video footage incentivized officers to be more responsive to performative as well as procedural demands, yet failed to affect some desired outcomes such as racial disparities in police actions. Chapter 3, on the contrary, explores how representation of marginalized groups in police shapes police behavior. Combining insights from social identity theory and representative bureaucracy, two discrete-choice conjoint experiments were performed in the Korean National Police, an agency that has faced pressure to enhance gender equity. Results demonstrate that, compared with male officers, female officers are more likely to represent the preferences of female clients when their task involves salient female disadvantages, such as intimate-partner violence. Improving police behavior is important, but is it enough to enhance public confidence in police? Drawing on policy feedback theory, Chapter 4 addresses this follow-up question using a high-profile policy change: Arizona S.B.1070 and its copycat immigration enforcement laws. These laws faced criticisms for accelerating racial profiling against Hispanics and Latinos, but their actual implementation by frontline officers was delayed and ultimately restricted by the courts. Nevertheless, results of difference-in-differences analyses demonstrate that the passage of these laws had a disproportionately negative impact on confidence in police among Hispanics and Latinos compared with the rest of society. The findings of this dissertation highlight the importance of bureaucrats’ willingness and capacity to meet public demands without necessarily being directed by control mechanisms to do so, as well as a need to integrate policy and management angles to tackle critical issues in citizen-state interactions.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Public administration
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Bureaucratic behavior
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Causal inference
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Policing
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Public management
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Street-level bureaucracy
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
http://dissertations.umi.com/gsn.newark.rutgers:10211
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
145 pages : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-k329-yg51
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kang
GivenName
Inkyu
Role
Copyright holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2022-06-14T14:42:44
AssociatedEntity
Name
Inkyu Kang
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.7
ApplicationName
Microsoft® Word for Microsoft 365
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2022-05-06T00:19:28
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2022-05-06T00:19:28
Back to the top
Version 8.5.5
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024