Staff View
Future states: imperial violence and nonlinear time in late Victorian fiction

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Future states: imperial violence and nonlinear time in late Victorian fiction
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Reinken
NamePart (type = given)
Brian
DisplayForm
Brian Reinken
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kucich
NamePart (type = given)
John
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kurnick
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Kurnick
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = local)
member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Goodlad
NamePart (type = given)
Lauren
DisplayForm
Lauren Goodlad
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = local)
member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mufti
NamePart (type = given)
Nasser
DisplayForm
Nasser Mufti
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = local)
member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (keyDate = yes)
2023
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (type = degree); (qualifier = exact)
2023-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2023
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation explores how British fiction published from 1860 to 1900 responded to the geopolitical violence of New Imperialism by imagining nonlinear forms of time that replace failed narratives of historical progress with open-ended, nonviolent futures. It offers a new reading of literary history by dwelling on the formal and political innovations of nineteenth-century prose fiction, whose experiments in literary temporality laid the groundwork for anticolonial evaluations of imperialism’s future. Scholars have traditionally emphasized nineteenth-century British literature’s optimism about the likelihood of gradual historical improvement. This project, in contrast, builds on recent histories of the nineteenth century and studies of colonial liberalism to demonstrate how the ubiquity of imperial violence led some British writers to regard the future with horror and dismay. In their eyes, doctrines of progress had become inseparable from perpetual bloodshed in the name of civilization. Consequently, they rejected progress as an inherently desirable goal, and they developed nonlinear modes of time through which to imagine the advent of nonviolent futures. This dissertation reveals that the prospect of sudden catastrophe remained central to Victorian ideas of time even when gradualist models of history were gaining traction in the wake of evolutionary theory. It identifies the temporal experiments typically associated with twentieth-century modernism as outgrowths of nineteenth-century fiction, not departures from it. Above all, it demonstrates that writers of British fiction had already developed a sophisticated tradition of anticolonial discourse by the end of the nineteenth century. These writers contributed to literary aesthetics, but they also contemplated how to inaugurate more ethical practices of international politics in a globalizing, multipolar world. The project’s introduction addresses how the Indian Rebellion of 1857 encouraged British intellectuals, including John Stuart Mill and Charles Darwin, to assume that progress always entails bloodshed. In this context, the subsequent four chapters combine historicist and formalist analysis to show how British writers salvaged the possibility of a nonviolent future by developing nonlinear narratives that reject linear progress altogether. Each chapter examines a particular genre: the historical novel, the Bildungsroman, the travelogue, and the invasion narrative. George Eliot reimagines biblical prophecy as a mode of historical scholarship to decry the increasing prominence of force in European international relations; Olive Schreiner and H. Rider Haggard reinvent the Bildungsroman as an open-ended narrative form whose forking paths register the multiple possible futures available to war-torn settler colonies in southern Africa; Rudyard Kipling laments the homogenizing effects of British soft power by writing global travelogues defined by a pervasive sense of déjà vu; and H. G. Wells and M. P. Shiel envision the complete partition of the world among imperialist powers as a synonym for the end of time itself. A brief conclusion to the project contends that anticolonial treatises by J. A. Hobson and Mohandas Gandhi inherit the nineteenth-century practice of envisioning a nonviolent future by means of nonlinear time. Their work demonstrates how major strands of twentieth-century anticolonial discourse adopted and adapted the formal techniques of Victorian fiction.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
English literature
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literature
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Empire
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Nonlinear
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Novel
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Time
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Victorian
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Violence
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
http://dissertations.umi.com/gsnb.rutgers:12400
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
315 pages
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-fgnq-8517
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Reinken
GivenName
Brian
Role
Copyright holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2023-04-27T16:35:25
AssociatedEntity
Name
Brian Reinken
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2023-04-27
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2024-04-27
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after April 27, 2024.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.7
ApplicationName
iLovePDF
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2023-03-16T23:25:56
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2023