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Perspective-taking accuracy on a conceptually complex problem

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Perspective-taking accuracy on a conceptually complex problem
Identifier
ETD_1615
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051191
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Education
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Perception
Abstract
Perspective taking is the process of constructing an understanding of other persons' ways of conceptualizing and responding to situations. It involves the effortfulemployment of strategies that enable individuals to visualize, understand, anticipate, or
predict the perceptions, thoughts, feelings, or actions of others. This is achieved when the observer attempts to create a mental model that corresponds to another's own mental model of situations. The present research was designed in the context of a model that views perspective taking as a process of constructing a representation that varies in difficulty according to (a) the degree of similarity between the perspective taker and the target person and (b) the degree of similarity between the perspective taker's own life situation and that of the person whose perspective is taken (target situation) (Cutting &Chinn, 2007).
The perspective-taking problem provided to participants (college students enrolled in an educational psychology course) is unlike most prior research on perspective taking. It required them to predict how a conceptually novel target person (a villager living in Los Molinos, Peru) responded to a dissimilar situation (introduction of water purification practices). Multiple source documents on this topic provided opportunities for participants to seek out information and adjust their mental models accordingly. In addition, a variety of prompts and scaffolds to promote strategy use were
examined for their influence on perspective-taking accuracy. Results from this study showed that brainstorming multiple predictions facilitated initial prediction accuracy and that new information in critical source documents enhanced final prediction accuracy.
However, cognitive biases, such as rationalizing anomalous information and confirmation bias, interfered with correcting inaccurate predictions.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 193 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (150-163)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Maris F. Cutting
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cutting
NamePart (type = given)
Maris F.
NamePart (type = date)
1947
Role
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author
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Maris F. Cutting
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chinn
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Clark
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Clark A. Chinn
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
DeLisi
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
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Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Richard DeLisi
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hmelo-Silver
NamePart (type = given)
Cindy
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
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Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Cindy Hmelo-Silver
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gehlbach
NamePart (type = given)
Hunter
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Hunter Gehlbach
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg)
NjNbRU
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37W6CDF
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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491520
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