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Neuromodulation of inhibitory feedback to pacemaker neurons and its consequent role in stabilizing the output of the neuronal network

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Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Neuromodulation of inhibitory feedback to pacemaker neurons and its consequent role in stabilizing the output of the neuronal network
SubTitle
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ETD_1942
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051647
Language (objectPart = )
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eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neural networks (Neurobiology)
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neural transmission
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Electrophysiology
Abstract
Stable oscillations can be important for the proper function of neuronal networks. Rhythmic movements, for example, often rely on stable input from central pattern generator (CPG) networks that generate the underlying oscillations. I used the crustacean pyloric motor network as a model oscillatory neural system. The primary goal is to characterize the effects of the neuropeptide proctolin on the LP to PD synapse and consequently to investigate functional role in shaping the network output.
First, I characterized the effects of proctolin on both the spike-mediated and graded components of the LP to PD synapse. The results showed that both components of the LP to PD synapse were enhanced by bath-applied proctolin. The results also showed that proctolin caused facilitation of the LP to PD synapse with injection of low amplitude depolarization steps. This facilitation is associated with a slow inward Ca 2+ like current.
Second, I investigated the function of the LP to PD synapse in the pyloric network. The results showed that the LP to PD synapse reduced the variability in the pyloric period. Also, analysis of the phase response curve (PRC) showed that the LP to PD synapse reduced the effect of perturbations. We used synaptic-PRC and its relationship with synaptic phase and synaptic duty cycle to explain how the LP to PD synapse counteracts the effect of perturbation.
Third, I examined the role of proctolin in shaping the neural network output. It was found that in the presence of proctolin the variability of pyloric period was reduced. Furthermore, using PRC analysis, I demonstrated that proctolin reduced the effect of extrinsic perturbations on the pacemaker neurons in the presence of LP to PD synapse. The results suggest that proctolin, through its enhancement on the LP to PD synapse, plays an active role in stabilizing the pyloric network oscillation.
Our findings suggest that modulations of the inhibitory feedback synapse can be a useful approach to regulate the stability of neuronal networks. Insights gained from this thesis could be applied to mammalian nervous system such as feedback or recurrent inhibitory circuits in cortex or oscillator-driven respiratory CPGs.
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electronic resource
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viii, 114 p. : ill.
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Ph.D.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 107-114)
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by Shunbing Zhao
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Zhao
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Shunbing
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Shunbing Zhao
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Farzan
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Farzan Nadim
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Golowasch
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Jorge
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Jorge Golowasch
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Bose
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Amitabha
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Amitabha Bose
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Christina
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outside member
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Christina Mouser
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - Newark
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OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
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2009-10
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xx
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10002600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3MC906K
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Notice
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Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Zhao
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Shunbing
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Shunbing Zhao
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Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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