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An in vitro assay for acupuncture

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
An in vitro assay for acupuncture
SubTitle
effects of gel composition, properties, and geometry on the alignment response
Identifier
ETD_2378
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000052122
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3KH0NGP
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Colloids
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Acupuncture
Abstract (type = abstract)
Acupuncture is a traditional Eastern therapy that is increasingly used as an alternative therapy in the United States, but remains poorly understood. During acupuncture, needles are inserted subcutaneously at specific acupuncture points and rotated to achieve "de qi", a warming sensation felt by the patient, which to the therapist coincides with a grasping resistance to further needle manipulation. Research has demonstrated that needle grasp results specifically from loose fascial connective tissues winding around the needle, and that needle grasp is stronger at acupuncture points, which fall above intermuscular fascial planes, than other locations on the body. To determine if mechanical stimulation is related to the therapeutic benefits of acupuncture, the features that govern the enhanced mechanical coupling need to be understood, but this is difficult to evaluate in vivo or in situ. In this thesis, several of these features are examined in a controlled, in vitro setting using collagen gels as the basis. The thickness, concentration, mechanical properties, size, shape, and composition of collagen gels were systematically altered, and the response to controlled acupuncture evaluated by capturing the evolution of fiber alignment using polarized light microscopy. Alignment was observed to increase with increasing collagen concentration, but decrease when the collagen was stiffened via crosslinking. Crosslinked gels failed after fewer rotations than untreated gels. Alignment was increased with increasing depth of insertion, but decreased in thicker gels when needle depth was held constant. Collagen gels cast in ellipses or strips to mimic fascial plane anatomy resisted failure and aligned more readily than circular gels. Alignment in these gels was anisotropic, with stronger alignment across the ellipse or plane, and entrapped rat fibroblasts followed the alignment pattern. The inclusion of fibrin in a composite gel with collagen significantly increased the ability of the gel to withstand needle rotations, which ultimately generated significantly greater alignment. The addition of hyaluronic acid produced less dramatic effects. Connective tissue is uniquely structured and organized to enable specific and substantial mechanical interactions during acupuncture. The in vitro system can be expanded to study cellular responses for understanding of underlying biological mechanisms and subsequent engineering applications.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xii, 101 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 94-99)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Margaret Julias
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Julias
NamePart (type = given)
Margaret
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Margaret Julias
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shreiber
NamePart (type = given)
David
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David I Shreiber
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Buettner
NamePart (type = given)
Helen
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Helen M Buettner
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pedersen
NamePart (type = given)
Henrik
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Henrik Pedersen
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dunn
NamePart (type = given)
Michael
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Michael G Dunn
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Julias
GivenName
Margaret
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
Label
Place
DateTime
2010-01-04 12:48:52
Detail
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Margaret Julias
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
3952640
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
eec93c8e290b28ee3a9a1c9159fc75207edfe9b9
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