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Investigating variation in teaching with technology-rich intervention

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Investigating variation in teaching with technology-rich intervention
SubTitle
what matters in teaching and teacher training at scale
Identifier
ETD_2087
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001500001.ETD.000052899
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Mathematics Education
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Teachers--Training of
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mathematics--Study and teaching
Abstract
A main question this dissertation addresses is: what variation in teaching and teacher training matter? This question is examined within a specific but important context: the scale-up of a technology-rich intervention focused on the algebra strand of 8th grade mathematics. I conducted a multi-level case study by gathering and analyzing data at all three levels of a train-the-trainer model of teacher professional development: from training of regional trainers, to teacher training, to classroom enactment. This case study was contextualized by a larger randomized experiment in the Scaling up SimCalc project. The larger project demonstrated the SimCalc intervention produced robust effects on student learning. Although treatment classrooms outperformed control classrooms, there was variation in student outcomes among teachers who used SimCalc. In the multi-level case studies, I sought to understand why two particular teachers had very different levels of student outcomes. This puzzle was unraveled using a mixed methodology by first searching for distinctive features of their enactments that may have influenced student outcomes, and then looking for connections between these features and the teacher training workshop attended. Within this framework, the investigation provides arguments for these key findings: 1) Within the specific context of the SimCalc intervention, a wide variety of enactments may be acceptable and successful, provided a) the main ideas are presented accurately, b) students are given adequate time and c) students are given a reasonable amount of autonomy with the materials. 2) Assuming a robust intervention, there may be unexpected benefits in allowing teachers to enact materials within a comfort-zone of teaching that he/she finds effective in his/her classroom. 3) The training workshops were successful in broad goals, but less successful in communicating other more pedagogically-based goals to all teachers. This dissertation is significant in that 1) it documents successful teaching practices in a prominent, successful scale-up experiment, 2) it investigates a complete “train-the-trainer” process, 3) it sheds light on the complex relationship between a teacher’s mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) and the quality of enacted instruction, and 4) it provides practical insight to trainers of short-term workshops, most notably: be realistic about what training can and cannot accomplish.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xiii, 245 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Margaret Breslin Dunn
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dunn
NamePart (type = given)
Margaret Breslin
NamePart (type = date)
1960-
Role
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author
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Margaret Dunn
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Schorr
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Roberta Y
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Roberta Y Schorr
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Belzer
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Alisa
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Alisa Belzer
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Hegedus
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Stephen
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Stephen Hegedus
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Roschelle
NamePart (type = given)
Jeremy
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Jeremy Roschelle
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30Z73B4
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Dunn
GivenName
Margaret
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2009-09-28 22:09:31
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Margaret Dunn
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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983040
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