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Imitative ability in preschool age children with autism in the presence of odor

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Imitative ability in preschool age children with autism in the presence of odor
Identifier
ETD_2571
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000052997
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Autism spectrum disorders
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Imitation in children
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Olfactory receptors
Abstract (type = abstract)
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are generally thought to be impaired in the ability to imitate, but the causal processes responsible for this deficit are not well understood. Different theoretical perspectives offer different insights as to which behaviors are most difficult for individuals with ASD to imitate and why. This study investigated the imitative ability of five 3-5 year old children with ASD and thirty-two of their typically developing peers of the same ages on several categories of behavior thought to be difficult for individuals with ASD to imitate, including emotional expressions, motor behaviors, and sequences. Imitation was assessed twice using a newly refined imitation test, with approximately 1 week between visits. Imitation was scored for each component of the action imitated for each repetition. Overall, there were differences in imitative ability due to age for every category measured and due to diagnosis for nearly every category, with larger effect sizes for age. When all categories were measured at once, there was a significant age X diagnosis interaction; performance of older children with ASD approximated that of older typically developing children but younger children with ASD were consistently the worst imitators. Odor effects were modest. In general, odor affected imitative performance differently for older and younger children, with younger children benefiting more from odor when imitating more complex tasks. Looking behavior also varied according to age and diagnosis, with younger children with ASD appearing disorganized in their strategy for attending during the imitation task. The other groups appeared similar, with older children with ASD approximating the looking behavior of younger typically developing children. Looking behavior and imitation performance were related. It is suggested that the study of imitation should be broad enough to speak to multiple theoretical perspectives so as to create a more unified description of imitative abilities in individuals with ASD.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xii, 169 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Caroline Nell Coffield
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Coffield
NamePart (type = given)
Caroline Nell
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Caroline Coffield
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Haviland-Jones
NamePart (type = given)
Jeannette M
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Jeannette M Haviland-Jones
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hudson
NamePart (type = given)
Judith
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Judith Hudson
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Harris
NamePart (type = given)
Sandra
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Sandra Harris
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Reddy
NamePart (type = given)
Linda
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Linda Reddy
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3513Z89
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Coffield
GivenName
Caroline
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-11 23:30:19
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Caroline Coffield
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1955840
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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