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Rethinking Athenian imperialism

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Rethinking Athenian imperialism
SubTitle
sub-hegemony in the Delian League
Identifier
ETD_2519
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053098
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = corporate)
Delian League
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Classics
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Athens (Greece)--History
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation examines the territorial possessions of the members of the Delian League, which I refer to as sub-hegemonies, since these regional hegemonies existed under the overarching control of Athens. Specifically, this study focuses on the administrative processes of syntely (grouping of tributaries often headed by a regional hegemonic state) and apotaxis (dissolution of tributary groupings) as a means of illuminating wider questions of fiscal administration, clashing imperialisms, and the coherence of tributary polities. Traditionally, scholars of the Delian League have mainly focused on Athens’ role as the hegemonic state of an empire stretching throughout the Aegean and Ionia. Canonical studies such as the Athenian Tribute Lists and Russell Meiggs’ Athenian Empire have traced the development of Athens from the head of an alliance to the ruthless mistress of an empire. Much scholarship was devoted to charting the ways in which Athens exerted her will over her imperial subjects. Little attention was focused on the allies themselves outside of generalizations about the disenchantment with Athenian rule and periodic revolts. In place of an analysis of this kind, I examine the various sub-hegemonies that many allies in the league controlled, such as the peraiai (‘coastal strips’) possessed by the large insular allies, including Thasos and Rhodes, as well as the regional hegemonies of important littoral states. My conclusions reveal that Athenian policy was much more varied than previous analysis has shown and that the allied states often managed the tribute system to their advantage and were generally successful in maintaining their traditional spheres of influence. For example, syntelic and apotaxic tributary arrangements were primarily strategies employed by the allies to meet the changing demands for tribute and not solely determined by Athens to enhance revenue or weaken an ally. Moreover, Athens generally tolerated and even supported the historical claims of large states such as Miletos, and Mytilene. Thus, Athenian policy was more flexible and less imperialistic than is often understood.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
v, 238 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Sean Ryan Jensen
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jensen
NamePart (type = given)
Sean Ryan
NamePart (type = date)
1979-
Role
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author
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Sean Jensen
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Figueira
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas J.
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Thomas J. Figueira
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Brennan
NamePart (type = given)
Corey
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Corey Brennan
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
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Connolly
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Serena
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Serena Connolly
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Luraghi
NamePart (type = given)
Nino
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Nino Luraghi
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3TX3FGN
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Jensen
GivenName
Sean
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-03-30 20:17:36
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Sean Jensen
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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1157120
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