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Giacomo Leopardi

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Giacomo Leopardi
SubTitle
shades of black : misanthropy in Lo zibaldone
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
Misanthropy in Lo zibaldone
Identifier
ETD_1403
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000054810
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Leopardi, Giacomo, 1798-1837. Zibaldone
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Italian
Abstract (type = abstract)
The work of Giacomo Leopardi has typically been analyzed by contrasting the noble values of the classical past against his perception of the inferior cultural condition found in the contemporary world. Leopardi believed that modern society at large was in decay as evidenced by the constant use of the word odio, hate, in relation to it and its members. Odio, and other misanthropic terms, are found so frequently and in such varied contexts in Lo Zibaldone, that one quickly understands that his feelings are more raw and less theoretical than past literary criticism would indicate. Leopardi’s hatred is misanthropic, a strong dislike and rejection of humankind itself. It is not that Leopardi dislikes everything, but rather, everyone. His negativity is directed toward people and their selfishness and lack of vision. Previous interpretations of his work focus on Leopardi’s pessimism but do not acknowledge that it is not expressed toward life itself, but rather the disappointing and inadequate actions of individuals and groups. Depending on the variety of odio, the misanthropy that he is experiencing or exposing, there is a different motivation behind it. The concept of hate has been considered by some critics to be one-dimensional when in fact for Leopardi l’odio has many textures and layers. It is not simply that Leopardi dislikes humanity but instead has a complete methodology of misanthropic thought. The significance of misanthropy in Leopardi’s work can not be overstated and is the genesis of his creativity. The scope of this work is to clearly delineate the three types of Leopardi’s misanthropy which until now has been viewed as homogenous: dislike of strangers, dislike of peers, and dislike of self each serve a particular literary purpose. The functions of these variants will subsequently be defined in detail. An analysis of Leopardi’s misanthropy renders the conventional interpretation of poems such as La ginestra erroneous and superficial. Specifically the concept of Leopardi as a poet of the fraternity of man and promoter of solidarity in the battle against Nature will be proven incorrect.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
vii, 205 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by William Eugene Roney
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Roney
NamePart (type = given)
William
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
William Roney
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Leake
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Elizabeth Leake
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
White
NamePart (type = given)
Laura S
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Laura S White
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Marsh
NamePart (type = given)
David
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David Marsh
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rennie
NamePart (type = given)
Nicholas
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Nicholas Rennie
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3XG9R35
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Roney
GivenName
William
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2008-12-17 20:52:21
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
William Roney
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
788480
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
f3aeb21d41c649db5b5387e73ce65b1de2b2266c
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