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Efficacy of arsenic exposure reduction via drinking water treatment systems

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Efficacy of arsenic exposure reduction via drinking water treatment systems
Identifier
ETD_1709
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000054811
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Public Health
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Drinking water--Arsenic content--New Jersey
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Well water--New Jersey
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Biological monitoring--New Jersey
Abstract (type = abstract)
Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, exceeds the maximum contaminant level in New Jersey private wells at a higher percentage than any other contaminant with a primary drinking water standard. New Jersey’s drinking water standard for arsenic at 5 µg/L is currently the most protective in the world. Water treatment systems can remove arsenic from drinking water, either from the entire home (point-of-entry) or just at a single tap (point-of-use) for drinking and cooking. The goal of this research was to compare human exposure to arsenic between point-of-entry and point-of-use water treatment, by biomonitoring, to determine which level of treatment most effectively reduced arsenic exposure and dose from water at home to acceptable risk levels. The study recruited 53 subjects in 22 households obtaining arsenic water treatment, and five control subjects with little or no measurable arsenic in their water supply. The mean arsenic concentration in untreated water was 44 µg/L. Biomonitoring started before initiation of water treatment and continued for up to three years with samples analyzed at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. The study determined that: 1) dietary arsenic can be a major confounder in arsenic biomonitoring studies; 2) arsenic speciation techniques are extremely valuable for arsenic biomonitoring studies; 3) sampling protocols and reference values for arsenic in urine and blood should be recommended; 4) arsenic water treatment systems are effective in reducing arsenic exposure from well water; 5) there is a measurable arsenic body burden after chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water; 6) there is a two-compartment clearance of arsenic from urine, after cessation of ingesting the arsenic contaminated water; and 7) after nine months of water treatment, the adjusted mean inorganic-related arsenic concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the point-of-entry treatment group with a mean ± standard error of 2.7 ± 0.6 µg/g creatinine than in the point-of-use treatment group at 6.1 ± 0.7 µg/g creatinine. In conclusion, point-of-entry treatment of arsenic-contaminated well water should be recommended in preference to point-of-use.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
x, 204 p. : ill., maps
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Steven E. Spayd
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Spayd
NamePart (type = given)
Steven
NamePart (type = date)
1957-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Steven Spayd
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Robson
NamePart (type = given)
Mark Gregory
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Mark Gregory Robson
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Buckley
NamePart (type = given)
Brian Thomas
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Brian Thomas Buckley
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gochfeld
NamePart (type = given)
Michael
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Michael Gochfeld
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhang
NamePart (type = given)
Junfeng (Jim)
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Junfeng (Jim) Zhang
Name (ID = NAME-6); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cohn
NamePart (type = given)
Perry
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Perry Cohn
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T32807K0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Spayd
GivenName
Steven
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2009-04-15 01:32:19
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Steven Spayd
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1320960
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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