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High school early adopters of digital technology

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
High school early adopters of digital technology
Identifier
ETD_2758
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001500001.ETD.000055920
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Educational Administration and Supervision
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Educational technology
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Teaching--Aids and devices
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Teaching--Methodology
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
High school teaching
Abstract (type = abstract)
Although the number of studies was growing, there was little qualitative research investigating the issue of how classroom teachers were integrating technology for educational purposes. With all the money spent on technology in education, there had not been many studies attempting to determine how teachers were using it in classroom lessons. The findings of this study will contribute to the literature on technological integration to promote content learning. A qualitative case study design was used to examine how teachers in advanced technology high schools were integrating digital technology into classrooms. A preliminary screening survey identified the three technology advanced high schools in a defined geographical region. Three early adopter teachers in each of these schools were interviewed, observed in classrooms, and asked to provide documents regarding their lessons and student products. By closely examining and describing the teachers’ uses of specific technology applications, recurring themes shed light on the use of technology in advanced technology public high school settings. The findings highlighted teacher technology use and some best practices by the early adopters in high schools and provided significant insight into the three interactive domains that must be balanced: teacher, project, and school. The factors that influenced teachers to adopt technology were categorized into school and global forces. The teachers reported using multimedia to communicate and engage the students. They used more of a constructivist approach to extend their students’ learning experience and used the power of the Internet to continue class discussions and enhance their lessons beyond the classroom. In the end, the teachers perceived the benefits of technology use greatly outweighed any frustrations they experienced. This case study can serve as a model for how teachers and administrators may incorporate technology into their classrooms. Technology offered many benefits to teachers and students, yet few qualitative studies support this and demonstrate how technology’s integration had been successfully and meaningfully accomplished. This study provides insight and knowledge regarding how teachers and administrators may successfully integrate technology and assist in replicating the success in other schools and classrooms.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 157 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Thomas A. Gorman
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gorman
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas A.
NamePart (type = date)
1969-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Thomas Gorman
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bliss
NamePart (type = given)
James
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
James Bliss
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Firestone
NamePart (type = given)
William
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
William Firestone
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boling
NamePart (type = given)
Erica
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Erica Boling
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T39023KH
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gorman
GivenName
Thomas
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-06-18 16:13:07
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Thomas Gorman
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
552960
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
0832aee8c2426ea6983b0221b25d40ddc2ff2d1a
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