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Can social relationships explain the race paradox in mental health?

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Can social relationships explain the race paradox in mental health?
Identifier
ETD_2978
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056634
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Sociology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
African Americans--Mental health
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Blacks--Mental health
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
African Americans--Social networks
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Blacks--Social networks
Abstract (type = abstract)
Biomedical research consistently finds that blacks have worse physical health than whites, even after controlling for socioeconomic status or SES. This relationship is expected, given blacks' disproportionate exposure to psychosocial stress and discrimination. However, despite decades of research on the topic, there is surprising lack of consensus regarding race differences in mental health status. In general, studies have found that blacks tend to have better mental health than whites, although the direction and magnitude of this relationship varies depending on the outcome used. How might we resolve these discrepant findings of race differences in mental health that run counter to both the race patterns found for physical health and the well-established SES gradient in health? Most past research attributes these unexpected findings (hereafter referred to as "the race paradox in mental health" to the idea that African Americans have stronger social networks that protect them against psychosocial distress. There has been little comparative work examining race differences in the structure of social ties, and virtually no research explicitly testing whether stronger social ties among blacks relative to whites (if they exist) can account for the race paradox in mental health. Using data from the 2003-2005 National Survey of American Life, I explore the extent to which family relationships, friendships, fictive kin relationships, and relationships with church members can explain the race paradox in mental health (using measures for any DSM mood/anxiety disorder, CES-D depressive symptoms, and self-rated mental health). The findings have implications for mental health measurement and how we understand the nature of social relationships among African Americans.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
ix, 190 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
Dawne Marie Mouzon
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Mouzon
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Dawne Marie
NamePart (type = date)
1979-
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author
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Dawne Mouzon
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Horwirz
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Allan V.
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chair
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Allan V. Horwirz
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Carr
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Deborah S.
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Deborah S. Carr
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Springer
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Kristen W.
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internal member
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Kristen W. Springer
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Rosenfield
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Sarah
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Sarah Rosenfield
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NamePart (type = family)
Keith
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Verna
Role
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Verna Keith
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T33N233X
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Mouzon
GivenName
Dawne
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-10-01 03:31:44
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Dawne Mouzon
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent (ID = RE-2); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Embargo
DateTime
2010-10-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2011.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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