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Integrating centralized and decentralized approaches for multi-robot coordination

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Integrating centralized and decentralized approaches for multi-robot coordination
Identifier
ETD_2746
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056919
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Robots--Control systems
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Robots--Motion
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Automation
Abstract (type = abstract)
Autonomous multi-robot systems play important roles in many areas such as industrial applications for repetitive tasks, explorations in hazardous environments, and military missions in extreme conditions. Many existing coordination strategies are developed for two general types of multi-robot systems including strongly centralized systems and completely decentralized systems. For strongly centralized systems, the global information including the environment as well as the locations of all the robots is shared. It is typical for small number of robots in well structural environments and is not robust to dynamic environment or failures in communications and other uncertainties. For completely decentralized systems, each robot is executing its own control schemes completely autonomously. There are no specified leaders throughout the mission, and the team organization does not have a set structure. In many real-world applications, it is beneficial to use so-called weakly centralized systems, in which the leader robot is not specified a priori, but it is selected dynamically during the mission to guide the robot team through dynamic environments or other uncertainties. It is very challenging to develop coordination strategies for this type of systems because of the dynamic nature of the team structures. The strategies should not only allow for on-line leader role selection but also enable formation decomposition and reconfiguration whenever necessary. In this thesis, we describe a general coordination framework for weakly centralized multi-robot systems that integrates the features from both strongly centralized and completely decentralized coordination strategies at the individual robot level. The framework allows the robots to reconfigure the formation dynamically in the presence of obstacles or other uncertainties in the environment, and promotes the main advantages of multi-robot systems such as flexibility and modularity. Since the control schemes can be decentralized and this framework allows for the selection of the motion planner and local controller for a given task, the framework can be naturally applied to multi-robot systems with larger scales. We have implemented this framework on a team of two-wheeled differential driven mobile robots. Significant results from numerical simulations and experiments have been obtained to demonstrate that the coordination schemes are effective and robust, and the framework is viable and can be scaled to relative large scale multi-robot systems.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
viii, 107 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ke Xu
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Xu
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Ke
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1979-
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author
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Ke Xu
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Song
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Peng
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Peng Song
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Baruh
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Haim
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Haim Baruh
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NamePart (type = family)
Yi
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Jingang
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Jingang Yi
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hsieh
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M. Ani
Role
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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M. Ani Hsieh
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZS2W7C
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Xu
GivenName
Ke
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-06-01 19:05:15
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Ke Xu
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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