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Problem solving and principal’s interaction with accountability

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TitleInfo
Title
Problem solving and principal’s interaction with accountability
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mayer
NamePart (type = given)
Steven J.
NamePart (type = date)
1963-
DisplayForm
Steven Mayer
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Firestone
NamePart (type = given)
William
DisplayForm
William Firestone
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Baker
NamePart (type = given)
Bruce
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Bruce Baker
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kempler-Rogat
NamePart (type = given)
Toni
DisplayForm
Toni Kempler-Rogat
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-01
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
PROBLEM: Increasing accountability in public schools has created a new set of problems for school leaders. With the prominence of high stakes testing, the pressure to make Adequate Yearly Progress, accountability for closing the achievement gap of every subgroup of students, the demand for a highly qualified faculty and related pressures from school boards and communities, school leaders are faced with an array of unstructured, complex problems. Set within a rich literature on educational leadership and the relatively unexplored literature on problem solving, this study examines the school principal’s interaction with the problems created by accountability to determine how expert leaders perceive, approach, and engage others in addressing complex problems. Three areas of interaction are explored (Leader Capacity, Leader Response and Organizational Response) in order to address the following questions: * Does the mental model of the expert principal differ from a more typical principal as it relates to problem solving? * How do leaders’ beliefs, conceptions of problems, and knowledge influence their response in problem solving? * How does the problem solving capacity of the expert school leader differ from that of the non-expert? * Are there leader responses to problems created by accountability that offer the best possibility of school success? METHOD: A total sample of 24 New Jersey middle school principals were selected using a regression analysis of three years of New Jersey data from within four quadrants of performance: High Socio Economic Status (SES) and higher than predicated performance, low SES and higher than predicted performance, high SES and lower than predicated performance, low SES and lower than predicated performance. These principals must have been leaders in their respective schools for at least two years permitting their school’s performance to serve as a proxy for expertise. Once selected, principals were interviewed by two researchers using an in-depth guide in order to probe areas of interest in the study. The data from the 24 interviews was coded using a qualitative software package and analyzed according to the conceptual framework serving as the basis of discussion and findings. FINDINGS: Differences exist between successful principals and typical principals with respect to approaching and resolving complex problems. This study finds patterns of influence that are significant in capturing attributes of successful school leadership. Specifically, more expert principals tend to operate with an inventive mindset that approaches problems with an open mind toward trying new avenues toward reform. Similarly these principals are more likely to set broad goals for a problem’s resolution and engage others in a substantive fashion. SIGNIFICANCE: Adding to the rich body of literature on school leadership by offering a construct for effective problem solving addresses an important area of study. In an era of increasing accountability, transparency, and complexity, identifying school leaders with the capacity to innovate and set broad goals for addressing the complex problems associated with student achievement is essential.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Educational Administration and Supervision
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3722
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
x, 143 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Steven J. Mayer
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Educational accountability--New Jersey
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Middle school principals--New Jersey--Interviews
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Problem solving
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Educational accountability--Decision making--New Jersey
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001500001.ETD.000063954
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3G44PB3
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Mayer
GivenName
Steven
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2011-12-08 14:34:09
AssociatedEntity
Name
Steven Mayer
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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