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Succession dynamics of Pine Barrens riverside savannas

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TitleInfo
Title
Succession dynamics of Pine Barrens riverside savannas
SubTitle
a landscape-survey approach
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smith
NamePart (type = given)
David C.
NamePart (type = date)
1975-
DisplayForm
David Smith
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lathrop
NamePart (type = given)
Richard G
DisplayForm
Richard G Lathrop
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dighton
NamePart (type = given)
John
DisplayForm
John Dighton
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hartman
NamePart (type = given)
JeanMarie
DisplayForm
JeanMarie Hartman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-05
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Pine Barrens riverside savannas are acidic seepage fens found on the flood terraces of streams and rivers of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Ecologically, they are comprised of six distinct vegetation communities, each listed as globally rare or imperiled. While pollen indicates that some individual savannas may have persisted in an open state for over 8,000 years, floristic studies conducted over the past century suggest a rapid decline in their distribution over that period. Savannas have historically been subject to extensive human exploitation for their iron and turf resources. However, all extant sites have been largely protected from direct anthropogenic alteration for the past 150 years. Succession, then, appears to be the most likely driver of this recent decline in savanna distribution. The goals of this study were to quantify the rate of decline based on a single dataset, identify the dominant succession patterns within the system, and suggest directions for future research. Using a variety of GIS and data visualization techniques, a multifaceted data exploration approach was taken to characterize succession dynamics over a 62-year period across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Dramatic loss of savanna cover was confirmed, with a decrease in total savanna area study-wide of 71.3% between 1940 and 2002. This study-wide decline was generally linear for each of three general classes of savanna (wet, graminoid and shrub). At the site level, these patterns were much more variable; apparently based on the distribution of savanna at the start of the study. Two distinct patterns of succession were apparent: one of locally persistent graminoid savanna, and one consistent with a shifting mosaic driven by rapid succession and disturbance from both fire and flood. Rapid declines appear to be driven primarily by the shifting mosaic that is not in a steady state. Persistent patches do show signs of slow decline through incursion of Atlantic white cedar. One potential causal factor, the composition of vegetation adjacent to savanna patches did not appear to have any influence on succession dynamics. The focus of future research should be on the influence of changing natural disturbance regimes and the factors that maintain locally persistent savanna patches.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Savanna ecology--New Jersey--Pine Barrens
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3907
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
ix, 69 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by David C Smith
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Savannas--New Jersey--Pine Barrens
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000065266
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T39Z93TZ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Smith
GivenName
David
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-04-11 12:32:58
AssociatedEntity
Name
David Smith
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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4282368
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
4290560
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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