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Effect of recent auditory environment on neural response in zebra finch auditory cortex

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TitleInfo
Title
Effect of recent auditory environment on neural response in zebra finch auditory cortex
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yang
NamePart (type = given)
Lillian
NamePart (type = date)
1985-
DisplayForm
Lillian Yang
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vicario
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Vicario
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McGann
NamePart (type = given)
John
DisplayForm
John McGann
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stromswold
NamePart (type = given)
Karin
DisplayForm
Karin Stromswold
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Songbirds provide a model for studying human vocal learning due to many similarities between the two systems, e.g. a critical period for vocal learning, hemispheric lateralization, and sensory-motor integration for vocal imitation. One area of study relevant to human communication is short term plasticity in auditory cortex as a function of recent auditory experience. Changes in auditory processing in adulthood have been observed in the caudo-medial nidopallium (NCM), a higher auditory area that is known to respond selectively to conspecific vocalizations. To test how recent auditory experience with sounds of another species affects selectivity, adult male zebra finches were housed for 9d in different auditory environments. Two groups of birds were isolated as individuals and received playback of either recorded zebra finch (CONENV; n=9) or canary (HETENV; n=11) aviary. A third group remained in the general zebra finch aviary (Aviary; n=8). On day 9, electrodes placed bilaterally in NCM of these awake restrained birds recorded extracellular multi-unit activity in response to presentation of novel conspecific(ZFStim) and heterospecific (CANStim) songs,and pure tones. We assessed differences in absolute response magnitude, stimulus-specific adaptation, and tuning between exposure groups, stimulus types, hemispheres, and at different depths in NCM. Both CONENV and HETENV had higher responses overall compared to Aviary. Absolute responses were stronger to ZFStim than to CANStim across all exposure conditions. Preferential responding to conspecific song was greater in the right hemisphere than the left and greater in dorsal than ventral regions of NCM overall. CONENV birds showed higher absolute responses and higher rates of stimulus-specific adaptation in the right hemisphere for both ZFStim and CANStim. HETENV birds had higher absolute responses in the left hemisphere and showed no hemispheric difference in adaptation rates. Exposure to a completely novel auditory environment alters auditory processing of natural stimuli in a lateralized, but not stimulus-specific, manner. The reversal in lateralized processing suggests that the two hemispheres exhibit plasticity in different ways when confronted with the challenge of a new acoustic feature space and are likely to play different roles in the maintenance or revision of perceptual filters and stimulus categories.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3926
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
v, 50 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Lillian Yang
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Zebra finch
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Auditory perception--Testing
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Audiometry, Speech
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000065299
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3S46QW7
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Yang
GivenName
Lillian
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-04-12 14:14:50
AssociatedEntity
Name
Lillian Yang
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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1790464
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1792000
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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