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Steps to a Sustainable Backyard Organic Garden

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
Note (type = date)
Summer 2011
Subject (authority = GGREAT)
Topic
Agriculture and Farming
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Organic gardening
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Compost bins
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Rainwater catchment
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Rainwater harvesting
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Sustainable gardening
Genre (authority = GEM)
research study
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
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application/pdf
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18 p.
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2011
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Rutgers University
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Extension
DescriptiveEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2011
Detail
Paper and video completed in partial requirement for the course, Colloquium: Ethics in Science and Society.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Teacher
Name
Julie M. Fagan
Affiliation
SEBS - Animal Science, Rutgers University
Type
Course
Label
Colloquium: Ethics in Science and Society
TitleInfo
Title
Steps to a Sustainable Backyard Organic Garden
Abstract (type = abstract)
Overview of compost bins, rainwater catchment systems, and use of plants as a natural pesticide
Abstract (type = summary)
(Joseph) After the rise of the industrial revolution and the mechanization of processes inherent to life, such as the many ways we acquire basic commodities needed for day to day subsistence, quantity became the goal for production. Look around at America's food production. Vast fields as far as the eye can see of monocultures, the growing of only one species of plant. This is a relatively new practice in human history. Due to the wealth and abundance of cheap fossil fuel energy, these systems can thrive and function without many flaws. Similar notions can be said of animal husbandry. Factory farming has given Americans and many in the first world access to an almost endless supply of animal protein. However, inherent problems in these systems of food production rest in their inability to self-sustain and even regenerate the resources necessary for their function. For example, in natural organic systems, soil typically isn't bare such as (when we till the ground). This then requires we use take special care to keep pests away from the plants we desire and use petroleum based pesticides. Pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides destroy the microbial life in the soil which typically builds resilient and strong plants. Now since the life is gone, the burden of the intervener is placed on us, so now we must maintain soil fertility with petroleum (oil/fossil fuel) based fertilizers. Now the plants become dependent on us for fertility, pest control, and a slew of other conditions necessary for growth. We've even come so far as to modify these organisms at a molecular level to deal with problems we ourselves have created. Irrationality ensues. These methods and approaches to food production have taken a serious toll on the quality of our food, especially in terms of nutrition. Serious consideration into how to make ourselves less dependent on these polluting and destructive methods for food production have always been around but really picked up cultural speed with the revolutionary ideas of the 1960's and 1970's. From those times looking to nature and natural systems for answers to our problems has been widely adopted. Thus the organic movement was born.

(Paul) One way to reduce the chemical content of your food from pesticides and herbicides is to have a backyard organic garden. In order to reduce the cost of these many times expensive projects, systems can be put in place. For example, a rainwater catchment system with compost bins. Soil and fertilizers can many times be the most expensive part of the system so having a compost bin can reduce this cost significantly. Composting will also reduce the size and weight of garbage picked up by the township. This will reduce the household’s ecological footprint and help the overall environment. The rainwater catchment system will reduce the cost of water used for gardening as well as have a large impact on the environment by using water that would otherwise add to runoff and need to be treated at the waste-water treatment plant. The crops that are grown during the summer can help reduce how much produce needs to be bought from the store and also allow the consumer to know exactly what is in their food. This project does have some precautions that must be taken into account. Only plants that are local to the area should be grown, otherwise an invasive species can be introduced and cause harm to the local environment. Overall backyard organic gardening can be a very rewarding and environmentally friendly activity for home owners.
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Redpath
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Paul
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RoleTerm (authority = marcrelator); (type = text)
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Todd
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Joseph
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Fagan
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Julie M.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrelator); (type = text)
Author
Affiliation
SEBS - Animal Science
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore00000002167.Manuscript.000066208
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
GGREAT Student Projects
Identifier (type = local)
rucore00000002167
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30G3J0P
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Redpath
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Paul
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Copyright holder
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
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Todd
GivenName
Joseph
Role
Copyright holder
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
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Fagan
GivenName
Julie M.
Role
Copyright holder
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Technical

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Manuscript
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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1146880
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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