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Rewriting our comments and revisiting revision practices

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TitleInfo
Title
Rewriting our comments and revisiting revision practices
SubTitle
new concepts for sustainable instruction in the writing classroom
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bier
NamePart (type = given)
Roni L.
NamePart (type = date)
1987-
DisplayForm
Roni Bier
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fitzgerald
NamePart (type = given)
William
DisplayForm
William Fitzgerald
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Epstein
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
DisplayForm
Richard Epstein
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The driving instructional tool in the majority of writing classrooms, comments, is failing students and instructors because comments are a tool, and not a technique. The utility of comments within the writing classroom is only as strong as its pairing with other instructional techniques. Using comments to teach comments is a flawed method of instruction, and if instructors want to properly use comments within their classes, they must first show their students how to use these techniques in improving their writing. Thus far, the focus of facilitating student revision and student growth within writing classrooms has been on the study of specific comments written by instructors on student papers. The study of such comments reveals the differences in styles, modes, and voices projected from those instructors, but it does reveal much about the intended goal of such comments, the advancement of student writing. Looking back on previous research and incorporating a multifaceted approach to revision helps to build sustainable writing instruction. A review of literature of comments suggests placing students in the center of the classroom by enabling students to take control over the revisions of their own work. This process cannot be done without teaching students how to do things with comments and how to use comments to their advantage. Starting from Joseph Harris’ Rewriting, the same steps toward revision which Harris suggests of students should be copied and applied to the way in which instructors facilitate such revision within the classroom. The improvement of student writing requires several steps which target particular issues with the status quo of commenting, and the use of Harris’ text will enable us to identify the steps. Incorporating revision into the classroom, inviting students into conversation about their text, and opening the lines of communication can help improve revision practices in writing classrooms. Through incorporating a new mastery model within the writing classroom, a technique that begins to show students how comments are made and what to do with them, students can begin to internalize the many processes which they can apply to any writing. The teacher’s goal is to help the student internalize the concepts and apply without the direct instruction of the teacher; however, many writing classrooms have lost this focus. If teachers refocus the classroom on the process of writing and even the process of editing and revising, students will become not just stronger students but writers. Adjustments in the writing classroom cannot occur overnight, but incorporating revision techniques into the course will eventually pay off as students learn to revise their work. These techniques, although not new, can prepare students for writing outside the composition classroom.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
English
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Composition (Language arts)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Criticism
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_4261
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
iii, 46 p.
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Roni L. Bier
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10005600001.ETD.000066526
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3CF9NXC
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bier
GivenName
Roni
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-09-21 03:22:37
AssociatedEntity
Name
Roni Bier
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2013-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2013.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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226816
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
235520
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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