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Getting away from it all

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Getting away from it all
SubTitle
constructing identity on vacation
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stein
NamePart (type = given)
Karen L.
NamePart (type = date)
1979-
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Karen Stein
Role
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author
Name (type = personal)
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Eviatar Zerubavel
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Carr
NamePart (type = given)
Deborah
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Deborah Carr
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Williams
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
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Richard Williams
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cerulo
NamePart (type = given)
Karen
DisplayForm
Karen Cerulo
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Nippert-Eng
NamePart (type = given)
Christena
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Christena Nippert-Eng
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-10
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This study examines the cognitive work individuals do in managing and negotiating identity while on vacation. Vacations represent a distinct opportunity for identity work as existing they are re-negotiated for a finite period of time. While away from select demands of everyday life existing identities are rearranged; some move to the foreground, others shift to the back, while still others are dismissed entirely. The temporary nature of the experience and its voluntary nature make such identity work possible, permissible, and often heartily anticipated. In doing so, some identities are easily paused, while others prove to be more enduring. Vacationers employ a variety of methods in response, in order to cognitively bound this time off and instrumentally manage connections to everyday life. To investigate such cognitive processes, this study draws on data from mixed qualitative methods gathered from three specific examples of vacation types, as well as a narrative analysis of a broad pool of vacation blogs. I identify two distinct forms of vacationing that have emerged from socio-cultural perspectives on leisure in the West: those who vacation for personal enrichment and self-improvement, and those who use their time off for rest and relaxation. Interviews and participant observation were used to gather data from volunteer tourists in China for the former group, and resort vacationers in Hawaii for the latter. While most vacations involve travel of some kind, not all individuals have the financial or temporal resources to go away and instead vacation at home. Interviews with such “staycationers” comprise the third group for this study. This analysis examines how individuals draw and negotiate cognitive boundaries around existing identities by analyzing issues of temporality, space and place, interactions with others, activities, and physical objects. I find that certain identities can be put “on hold,” while others gain prominence, or are even created for the short-term. In doing so this study contributes to an understanding of the means by which people use culture to construct and negotiate their set of identities. While vacationing activities may differ, cognitive methods of shaping and bounding identities transcend location and content.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Sociology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4198
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vi, 223 p.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Karen L. Stein
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Identity (Psychology)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Vacations--Social aspects
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066991
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3RN36M5
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Stein
GivenName
Karen
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-08-23 15:46:29
AssociatedEntity
Name
Karen Stein
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2013-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2013.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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