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Public housing and lethal violence

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TitleInfo
Title
Public housing and lethal violence
SubTitle
an analysis of the effect of the presence of public housing on homicide rates
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lesneskie
NamePart (type = given)
Eric G.
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Eric Lesneskie
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sullivan
NamePart (type = given)
Mercer
DisplayForm
Mercer Sullivan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Apel
NamePart (type = given)
Robert
DisplayForm
Robert Apel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Griffiths
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
DisplayForm
Elizabeth Griffiths
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pizarro
NamePart (type = given)
Jesenia
DisplayForm
Jesenia Pizarro
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
After the Second World War, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provided funding to local housing authorities to build large scale public housing developments in many cities across the United States. Unfortunately, most of those housing projects were beset with a host of problems as time progressed, including deteriorating building structures, concentrated poverty, racial segregation, and crime. In perhaps no city is this story more heavily studied than in Chicago. Chicago’s public housing tribulations are legendary and are well documented in the academic literature. Many of Chicago’s projects were large high-rise projects located in disadvantaged, isolated, and residentially distinct neighborhoods with strong gang, drug, and crime presence. However, relatively little research has examined the association between Chicago’s public housing and homicide. Specifically, it is uncertain as to whether the unique physical and social environments of public housing developments have an independent effect on lethal violence or whether the high rates of homicides occurring in public housing areas are influenced predominately by neighborhood conditions. Utilizing the Chicago Homicide Data set, this dissertation disentangles the effects of public housing on lethal violence. This study, first, estimated negative binominal regression models to determine the effect of the presence of public housing on tract level rates of homicide. The results of these analyses indicate that the presence of public housing is not a significant predictor of the rates of lethal violence and neighborhood conditions are driving the high rates of homicides occurring in public housing areas. Secondly, the nature of lethal violence occurring in public housing areas was determined by using negative binominal regression and bivariate analyses. Homicides, disaggregated by motive, do not occur at higher rates or disproportionately in Chicago’s tracts with public housing compared to tracts without. The findings from this dissertation indicate that public housing areas do not seem to be micro places that influence a specific type of violence and that neighborhood conditions are driving the high rates of homicide occurring in public housing areas rather than the unique physical and social environments of public housing developments.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Criminal Justice
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4748
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vii, 206 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Eric G. Lesneskie
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Public housing--Illinois--Chicago--History
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = corporate)
Chicago Housing Authority
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Crime in public housing--Illinois--Chicago
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Homicide--Illinois--Chicago--Research
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10002600001.ETD.000068721
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZS2V35
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Lesneskie
GivenName
Eric
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-04-25 07:54:03
AssociatedEntity
Name
Eric Lesneskie
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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