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The differential recovery of states from major violent and nonviolent opposition campaigns

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TitleInfo
Title
The differential recovery of states from major violent and nonviolent opposition campaigns
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stoddard
NamePart (type = given)
Judith G.
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Judith Stoddard
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schock
NamePart (type = given)
Kurt
DisplayForm
Kurt Schock
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ferguson
NamePart (type = given)
R. Brian
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R. Brian Ferguson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Van Ryzin
NamePart (type = given)
Gregg
DisplayForm
Gregg Van Ryzin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chenoweth
NamePart (type = given)
Erica
DisplayForm
Erica Chenoweth
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This study adds to the existing literature by bringing quantitative rigor to the study of how states recover from major opposition movements which are currently primarily qualitative in nature and mostly focused on how states recover from violent campaigns. Second, it begins to fill the gap in the absence of scholarly research in after transition structural stability. Many scholars have noted the fact that nonviolent campaigns emerge under certain conditions, and that they often succeed under another set of overlapping conditions. However, the longer-term impacts of these campaigns, are yet unknown. What this thesis has done is to examine a variety of potential impacts in the state’s structural stability indicators. As we continue to see the number of opposition movements increasing today, and realize that campaign organizers make a choice between violent and nonviolent tactics, it becomes vital to understand which type of campaign will help to establish the state’s future success and in what areas that successful will be lasting. The research question this study sought to answer is; does the choice of campaign type, in terms of violent or nonviolent tactics being utilized, and whether the campaign was successful, have an impact on the future growth of the state as measured in structural stability indicators. Successful nonviolent campaigns brought the most positive growth in increased: life expectancy, implementation of rule of law, degree of Democracy, infant mortality, respect for human rights, school enrollment and regional stability. Unsuccessful violent campaigns brought the most damage in five of the indicators: long term economic growth, implementation of rule of law, degree of Democracy, respect for human rights and regional stability. It appears that these states suffered all of the damages of a major campaign without the hopeful changes that a new regime can bring. It is hoped that future campaign organizers, and governments as well as individuals who want to support them, will see the numerous benefits of waging nonviolent campaigns and will choose peaceful means, in their quest for change. And it is hoped that this work has shown that states are better off, and make greater progress in future growth and stability for having had a major nonviolent campaign.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Global Affairs
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4794
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
ix, 369 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Judith G. Stoddard
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social movements
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Peace movements
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nonviolence
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political campaigns
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Campaign management
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10002600001.ETD.000068783
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3V69H67
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Stoddard
GivenName
Judith
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-05-01 15:05:37
AssociatedEntity
Name
Judith Stoddard
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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