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Development of a device for T-wave feature extraction and rapid baseline nulling

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TitleInfo
Title
Development of a device for T-wave feature extraction and rapid baseline nulling
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smith
NamePart (type = given)
David Winfield
NamePart (type = date)
1958-
DisplayForm
David Smith
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Li
NamePart (type = given)
John K-J.
DisplayForm
John K-J. Li
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shoane
NamePart (type = given)
George K.
DisplayForm
George K. Shoane
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Drzewiecki
NamePart (type = given)
Gary M.
DisplayForm
Gary M. Drzewiecki
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The T-wave of the electrocardiogram electrically represents ventricular repolarization – the relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle. Discrete states of abnormal T-wave morphology are known to be associated with both pathologic and non-pathologic causes. The links between causative factors and morphologic effects, however, are described as sensitive, but not specific. This thesis aimed to develop a device that could accurately quantify the T-wave’s characteristic morphologic features on a beat-to-beat basis, in real-time, to improve specificity. T-wave feature data were extracted with minimal noise using a novel analog electronic device design that allowed corrections for baseline drift and motion artifacts. T-wave morphologies were then approximated by geometric composite figures constructed from each T-wave’s constituent data, namely, its height and leading and trailing edge slopes. It was hypothesized that the T-wave approximation figures would convey clinically relevant information to an observer, notwithstanding their composition from highly compressed data. Simulated T-wave monitor designs were tested on 2,604 T-waves from thirty-two real and synthetic ECG data sources. Results from the study concluded that over 88% of the geometric composite figures were reasonable approximations of T-wave morphology. Noise on the T-wave signal was the primary cause for less-than-reasonable approximations. Feature accuracies were found to have less than 3% error when tested against a smaller subset of 260 T-wave controls. Clinical meaningfulness of the composite figures was demonstrated by observation of T-wave alternans and the effects of oxygen saturation levels on T-wave morphology. Average baseline drift was held to within 0.010 mV across a wide variety of input conditions. Complete transient response recovery from ±300 mV input pulses sometimes occurred in less than one heartbeat. The present novel methodology employed in the successfully tested T-wave monitor design can be extended to other ECG components, and has the potential to improve the accuracy of arrhythmia detection and classification in future applications.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biomedical Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4993
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xvi, 155 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by David Winfield Smith
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Electrocardiography
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Heart--Electric properties
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Biomedical engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T34747WT
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Smith
GivenName
David
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-09-11 16:16:26
AssociatedEntity
Name
David Smith
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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