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Letter, Washington Roebling to Wife, Emily Warren, June 23, 1864

Descriptive

Location
PhysicalLocation (displayLabel = Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives)
Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = local); (displayLabel = Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections)
TypeOfResource
Text
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Digital exhibition
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
Washington Roebling's mood approached despair during the seemingly endless siege of Petersburg. As he wrote to his wife Emily: "People talk about getting used to fighting and to battles, but I don't see it in that light, and the more experience I have the worse it gets....They must put fresh steam on the man factories up North; the demand down here for killing purposes is far ahead of the supply; thank God however for this consolation that when the last man is killed the war will be over."
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Washington Roebling's Civil War
Detail
Washington Roebling of Trenton, son of engineer John A. Roebling and future builder of the Brooklyn Bridge, enlisted as a private in Company A of the New Jersey State Militia in April 1861, resigning a few months later to enlist in the Sixth New York Independent Battery. He was later promoted to the rank of sergeant, and then to second lieutenant in January 1862. During the war, he built suspension bridges, made maps, and did reconnaissance from a hot-air balloon. He saw action at the battles of Second Bull Run, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, where he helped to secure Little Round Top, as well as the Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, and the Crater. In 1865, he was commissioned Colonel, U.S. Volunteers, by brevet for "gallant and meritorious services during the war."
AssociatedObject
Type
Placement in digital exhibition
Name
16
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Project manager
Name
Radick, Caryn.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities.
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civi War
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
image/jpeg
Extent
2 p.
TitleInfo
Title
Letter, Washington Roebling to Wife, Emily Warren, June 23, 1864
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = iso8601); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
1864-06-23
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civil War
Identifier (type = local)
rucore00000002220
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3JS9NMB
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = RU_Archives); (ID = RU_Archives_v5)
This work is made available for non-commercial educational, scholarly, or research purposes subject to the copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). Proper attribution must be provided.
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Source

Shelving
Locator (TYPE = Call number)
MC 654
Note
Roebling Family Papers, Box 13, Folder 31
ProvenanceEvent
Type
Exhibition
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civil War
Place
Special Collections and University Archives Gallery and Gallery '50, Rutgers University
DateTime (point = start); (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact)
2012-09-19
DateTime (point = end); (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact)
2013-08-31
AssociatedEntity
Role
curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Washington Roebling's Civil War
Detail
Washington Roebling of Trenton, son of engineer John A. Roebling and future builder of the Brooklyn Bridge, enlisted as a private in Company A of the New Jersey State Militia in April 1861, resigning a few months later to enlist in the Sixth New York Independent Battery. He was later promoted to the rank of sergeant, and then to second lieutenant in January 1862. During the war, he built suspension bridges, made maps, and did reconnaissance from a hot-air balloon. He saw action at the battles of Second Bull Run, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, where he helped to secure Little Round Top, as well as the Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, and the Crater. In 1865, he was commissioned Colonel, U.S. Volunteers, by brevet for "gallant and meritorious services during the war."
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
Washington Roebling's mood approached despair during the seemingly endless siege of Petersburg. As he wrote to his wife Emily: People talk about getting used to fighting and to battles, but I don't see it in that light, and the more experience I have the worse it gets....They must put fresh steam on the man factories up North; the demand down here for killing purposes is far ahead of the supply; thank God however for this consolation that when the last man is killed the war will be over.
Detail
Exhibition extended beyond dates listed on catalog.
SourceTechnical
SourceType
Text or graphic (paper)
Extent
2 p.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL2)
ContentModel
Document
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