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The local adaptation of the circadian clock's temperature compensation in Neurospora

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TitleInfo
Title
The local adaptation of the circadian clock's temperature compensation in Neurospora
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hozier
NamePart (type = given)
James
DisplayForm
James Hozier
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lee
NamePart (type = given)
Kwangwon
DisplayForm
Kwangwon Lee
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Nam
NamePart (type = given)
Jongmin
DisplayForm
Jongmin Nam
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lun
NamePart (type = given)
Desmond
DisplayForm
Desmond Lun
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (type = degree); (qualifier = exact)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that temperature compensation (TC) of the circadian clock plays a role in local adaptation. To test this hypothesis, we chose strains of Neurospora collected from different latitudes; Alaska (high) and Ivory Coast (low). To examine the molecular oscillator of these selected strains, we transformed the natural strains with a translational luciferase reporter of the key clock gene FREQUENCY (FRQ). To examine the developmental overt rhythm, we used the inverted race tube assay. Q10 values of the molecular periods and the developmental periods of each strain have been calculated, and used as a quantitative measure of TC. Our data suggest that the molecular oscillators of natural strains collected from different latitudes do not differ from one another, and their Q10 values are relatively similar to each other. However, we found that the developmental overt rhythms have different period and Q10 values and a period among the strains studied. The periods and Q10 values of developmental rhythm are also more variable when compared to those of the molecular rhythm. Taken our results together, we concluded that 1) TC plays a role in adaptation, 2) the adaptation occurred at either the output of the clock or at the coupling mechanism between the oscillator, and 3) the adaptation occurred at the developmental rhythm rather than the molecular oscillator
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5673
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
viii, 43 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by James Hozier
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Circadian rhythms
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neurospora--Effect of temperature on
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3513WFQ
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Hozier
GivenName
James
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-05-07 13:16:09
AssociatedEntity
Name
James Hozier
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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