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Political emotions

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TitleInfo
Title
Political emotions
SubTitle
the distinct influences of anger and contempt on voter perception and preference
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Johnston
NamePart (type = given)
Gabriel
NamePart (type = date)
1989-
DisplayForm
Gabriel Johnston
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Roseman
NamePart (type = given)
Ira
DisplayForm
Ira Roseman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Markey
NamePart (type = given)
Charlotte
DisplayForm
Charlotte Markey
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
August
NamePart (type = given)
Kristin
DisplayForm
Kristin August
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Recent research has demonstrated the undeniable influence of emotion on political decision making and voter choice. Research on negative campaigning has grown in the past decade, but a recent meta-analysis reached no conclusion about its effectiveness (Lau & Rovner, 2009). There is still debate in the literature as to whether the dimensional emotion perspective or the discrete emotion perspective is superior, and consequently few studies have examined whether discrete emotions (in this case anger and contempt) have differential impacts on voters’ perceptions of candidates. Although anger and contempt are both negatively valenced emotions related to interpersonal conflict, they differ in both social function and prototypical behaviors (Fischer & Roseman, 2007). This study tested the differential impacts of anger and contempt on voters’ reactions to presidential candidates by having three groups of participants watch the second presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney and indicate each time they either (1) perceive Obama or Romney to express anger or contempt or (2) feel anger or contempt toward Obama or Romney or (3) have favorable or unfavorable impressions of Obama or Romney. Pre- and post-debate questionnaires measured participants’ perceptions of the candidates and participants’ favorability towards the candidates. Multiple regression models tested the effects of anger and contempt on perceptions of presidential candidates and feelings of favorability toward those candidates. Feelings of anger and contempt inconsistently predicted a decrease in favorability, although feelings of anger better predicted negative perceptions than feelings of contempt. Expressions of anger by the candidates were overall related to a decrease in positive perceptions toward the expressing candidate and, in some cases, a decrease in negative perceptions of the opposing candidate. However, expressions of both anger and contempt by the candidates were also related to an increase in negative perceptions of the opposing candidate, although expressions of contempt had a stronger relationship with increased negative perceptions. Overall, anger and contempt were shown to have differential impacts on perceptions and favorability toward presidential candidates.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5688
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vii, 111 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Gabriel Johnston
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political sociology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Contempt (Attitude)--Political aspects
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political campaigns--United States
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T31834RT
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Johnston
GivenName
Gabriel
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-05-09 16:07:18
AssociatedEntity
Name
Gabriel Johnston
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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