Staff View
Persistent locomotor and behavioral effects resulting from developmental exposure to pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin are mediated by dopaminergic and serotonergic system dysfunction

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Persistent locomotor and behavioral effects resulting from developmental exposure to pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin are mediated by dopaminergic and serotonergic system dysfunction
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kung
NamePart (type = given)
Tiffany S.
DisplayForm
Tiffany S. Kung
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
White
NamePart (type = given)
Lori A
DisplayForm
Lori A White
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cooper
NamePart (type = given)
Keith R
DisplayForm
Keith R Cooper
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Richardson
NamePart (type = given)
Jason R
DisplayForm
Jason R Richardson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jordan
NamePart (type = given)
Rebecca C
DisplayForm
Rebecca C Jordan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Pyrethroid pesticides are generally considered to be a safer alternative to other classes of insecticides. However, there is increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. The hypothesis tested in this thesis is that exposure to pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin, at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the critical developmental period would result in persistent behavioral deficits, which are due, in part, to changes in dopamine and serotonin system gene expression and neurochemistry. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25 µg/L - 0.5 μg/L) during the embryonic period (3-72hpf), and then reared in treatment free water until the larval (2-week) and adult stages. Deltamethrin exposure during development resulted in increased locomotor activity, decreased drd1 and drd2a transcripts, and increased levels of dopamine (DA) metabolite, homovanillic acid, at the larval stage. Manipulating the DA system by concomitant knockdown of the dopamine transporter (DAT) during exposure rescued deltamethrin induced locomotor activity. Acute methylphenidate (DAT inhibitor) exposure increased locomotor activity in control larvae but reduced locomotor activity in larvae previously exposed to deltamethrin. These studies indicate that dopaminergic dysfunction mediates the behavioral effects observed in larval zebrafish following deltamethrin exposure during development. Behavioral characterization of adult zebrafish revealed a sex specific response in fish that had been exposed to deltamethrin during development, including increased distance travelled, velocity, bouts of high mobility, and aggression in males, and increased swim velocity, thigmotaxis, and altered rates of habituation in females. In adult males, transcript levels of serta, sertb, and drd2a, positively correlated with the magnitude of aggression. However, this correlation was lost in the population of male fish that had been developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Fluoxetine exposure attenuated aggression exhibited by dominant male zebrafish demonstrating the involvement of the serotonin system in mediating aggressive behavior. In conclusion, this research demonstrates that environmental influences during critical neurodevelopmental stages results in persistent neurobehavioral deficits. Also, we add to zebrafish ethology using the experimental behavioral paradigms adapted for our laboratory. Finally, we provide a mode of action for deltamethrin induced behavioral deficits which can assist in the cumulative risk assessment of this class of compounds.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Toxicology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Pyrethroids--Toxicology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Dopaminergic mechanisms
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Serotonin
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6000
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 147 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Tiffany S. Kung
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T33F4N37
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kung
GivenName
Tiffany
MiddleName
S.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-03 03:25:30
AssociatedEntity
Name
Tiffany Kung
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-10-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021