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Ambivalent hegemony

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TitleInfo
Title
Ambivalent hegemony
SubTitle
culture and power in colonial Java, 1808-1927
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
van der Meer
NamePart (type = given)
Arnout Henricus Cornelis
NamePart (type = date)
1980
DisplayForm
Arnout Henricus Cornelis van der Meer
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Adas
NamePart (type = given)
Michael
DisplayForm
Michael Adas
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smith
NamePart (type = given)
Bonnie
DisplayForm
Bonnie Smith
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Matsuda
NamePart (type = given)
Matt
DisplayForm
Matt Matsuda
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tagliacozzo
NamePart (type = given)
Eric
DisplayForm
Eric Tagliacozzo
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
“Ambivalent Hegemony” explores the Dutch adoption and subsequent rejection of Javanese culture, in particular material culture like dress, architecture, and symbols of power, to legitimize colonial authority around the turn of the twentieth century. The Dutch established an enduring system of hegemony by encouraging cultural, social and racial mixing; in other words, by embedding themselves in Javanese culture and society. From the 1890s until the late 1920s this complex system of dominance was transformed by rapid technological innovation, evolutionary thinking, the emergence of Indonesian nationalism, and the intensification of the Dutch “civilizing” mission. This study traces the interactions between Dutch and Indonesian civil servants, officials, nationalists, journalists and novelists, to reveal how these transformations resulted in the transition from cultural hegemony based on feudal traditions and symbols to hegemony grounded in enhanced Westernization and heightened coercion. Consequently, it is argued that we need to understand the civilizing mission ideology and the process of modernization in the colonial context as part of larger cultural projects of control. By emphasizing the interactions between the colonizers and the colonized, this study brings into focus a shared colonial space, thus bridging the fields of Indonesian and European colonial history. These interactions are explored in a number of sites that have proved of particular relevance. For example, the study of Javanese status symbols, such as the ceremonial parasol (payung), deference rituals, and a hybrid sartorial hierarchy reveals the ways in which the material grounds of colonial authority were contested. Likewise, an examination of hill stations, their architecture and function, illuminates the growing concerns surrounding the “physical body”, and fears of Westernization and Javanization among the Javanese and Dutch respectively. The various narratives are brought together in a discussion of annual fairs, their attractions, appearance and objectives in the colony’s capital at Batavia (Jakarta). These transformative themes in the history of Indonesia, which stress the place of material culture in legitimizing colonial regimes, are treated in depth for the first time as dimensions of a coherent process.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Java (Indonesia)--History--19th century
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Java (Indonesia)--History--20th century
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Java (Indonesia)--Social life and customs
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5766
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 372 p.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Arnout Henricus Cornelis van der Meer
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30R9R1N
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
van der Meer
GivenName
Arnout
MiddleName
Henricus Cornelis
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-08-07 16:06:32
AssociatedEntity
Name
Arnout van der Meer
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-10-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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