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Understanding humans’ strategies in maze solving from eye-hand coordination

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TitleInfo
Title
Understanding humans’ strategies in maze solving from eye-hand coordination
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhao
NamePart (type = given)
Min
DisplayForm
Min Zhao
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kowler
NamePart (type = given)
Eileen
DisplayForm
Eileen Kowler
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Feldman
NamePart (type = given)
Jacob
DisplayForm
Jacob Feldman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hummer
NamePart (type = given)
Pernille
DisplayForm
Pernille Hummer
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bekris
NamePart (type = given)
Kostas
DisplayForm
Kostas Bekris
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = artist's description)
Navigating through an overhead visual maze is a demanding task. It relies on the strategic use of eye movements to select and identify the route. Maze solving also makes demands on memory and vision, and requires frequent decision and plans. When solving a maze, there are trade-offs between spending time exploring to the environment and spending time learning from errors. The current study examined strategies used to solve novel and familiar mazes that were viewed from above and traversed by a mouse cursor. Recorded eye and mouse movements revealed two modes that almost never occurred concurrently: exploration and guidance. Analyses showed that people learned mazes and were able to devise and carry out complex, multi-faceted strategies that traded-off visual exploration against active motor performance. The results challenge the previous findings that people prefer to use the external world as an external memory and minimize the use of the own short-term memory. Instead, people balanced the use of memory and the access to the external world, and this balance varied among different individuals. Overall, strategies of maze-solving took into account available visual information, memory, confidence, the estimated cost in time for exploration, and tolerance for error. Maze-solving provides an environment in which people have to continuously make decisions and plan paths in real time. By modeling the strategies people use, it is possible to draw inferences about many aspects of cognitive processes, such as the real-time decision making, the usage of memory in natural tasks and eye-hand coordination. The understanding of the strategies in maze solving may also benefit applications, such as designing navigation assistive devices and the development of methods to coordinate the interaction between human and machines (including robots) in road guidance.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5960
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 98 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Maze puzzles
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Eye-hand coordination
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Memory
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Min Zhao
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38W3FX5
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Zhao
GivenName
Min
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-09-30 10:12:55
AssociatedEntity
Name
Min Zhao
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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